Party for the Commonwealth of Canada candidates, 1993 Canadian federal election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Party for the Commonwealth of Canada fielded several candidates in the 1993 federal election, none of whom were elected. Information about these candidates may be found here. The PCC was the political wing of Lyndon Larouche's movement in Canada.

Quebec[edit]

Richelieu: Paulo da Silva[edit]

Paulo da Silva identified as a manager.[1] He received 157 votes (0.33%), finishing fifth against Bloc Québécois incumbent Louis Plamondon.

Ontario[edit]

St. Paul's: Mike Twose[edit]

Twose described himself as an electrician. He campaigned against Canada's involvement in the North American Free Trade Agreement, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and related agreements (Toronto Star, 22 October 1993). He received 11 votes (0.02%), finishing twelfth against Liberal Barry Campbell.

In 2002, Twose wrote against the existing system of peer review for scientific grants and publications (Toronto Star, 2 October 2002).

British Columbia[edit]

Vancouver Centre: Lucylle Boikoff[edit]

Boikoff's first name is sometimes spelled as "Lucille". She campaigned for public office several times, and was described as a 64 year old retired teacher in 1990. She accused the International Monetary Fund of complicity with genocide in 1985.[2]

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
1975 Ontario provincial St. Catharines North American Labour 192 5/5 Robert Johnston, Progressive Conservative
1977 Ontario provincial Hamilton West Ind. (North American Labour) 144 4/4 Stuart Smith, Liberal
1984 federal Oshawa Commonwealth 74 5/6 Ed Broadbent, New Democratic Party
1985 Ontario provincial York South Independent 402 1.33 5/6 Bob Rae, New Democratic Party
1988 federal Oshawa Commonwealth 139 5/5 Ed Broadbent, New Democratic Party
1990 Ontario provincial Yorkview Independent 231 5/5 George Mammoliti, New Democratic Party
1993 federal Vancouver Centre Commonwealth 27 12/13 Hedy Fry, Liberal

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of Federal Ridings since 1867: RICHELIEU (1993/10/25), Parliament of Canada, accessed 13 August 2009.
  2. ^ "Metro area ridings", Toronto Star, 3 September 1990, A8.