Party of Hungarian Life

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Party of Hungarian Life
Magyar Élet Pártja
Leader Gyula Gömbös (1932-1936)
Béla Imrédy (1938-1939)
Miklós Kállay (1942-1944)
Founded 1932
Dissolved 1944
Succeeded by 1940, a pro-National Socialist faction under the leadership of Béla Imrédy split from the party to form the Party of Hungarian Renewal
Headquarters Budapest, Hungary
Ideology Szeged Idea
Political position Far-right
Colors White
Logo of the party seen during the early to late 1930s.
Flag of the party seen during the early to late 1930s.

The Party of Hungarian Life (Magyar Élet Pártja, MÉP), also previously known as the Party of National Unity (Nemzeti Egység Pártja) from 1932 to 1939, was a Hungarian Szegedist political party.[1][2] The party was similar to fascist movements in that it had a militia.[3] It first became the ruling party of Hungary from 1932 to 1936 under the leadership of Gyula Gömbös, who was Prime Minister of Hungary during that time.[4] Gömbös declared the party's intention to achieve "total control of the nation's social life".[5] In the 1935 Hungarian Election, Gömbös promoted the creation of a "unitary Hungarian nation with no class distinctions".[6]

The party won a huge majority of the seats of the Hungarian parliament in the Hungarian election of May 1939.[7] It won 72 percent of the parliament's seats and won 49 percent of the popular vote in the election.[8] This was a major breakthrough for the far-right in Hungary.[8] The party promoted nationalist and racist propaganda and its members sympathized with the Nazi Arrow Cross Party.[8]

A faction of the most pro-National Socialist members led by the party's former leader Béla Imrédy split from the party October 1940 to form the Party of Hungarian Renewal (Magyar Megújulás Pártja) that sought to explicitly solve the Jewish Problem.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stanley G. Payne. A history of fascism, 1914-1945. Oxon, England, UK: Routledge, 2005. Pp. 269.
  2. ^ Miklós Lackó. "Arrow-cross men, national socialists, 1935-1944", Studia historica, Magyar Tudományos Akadémia. Volume 61. Akadémiai Kiadó, 1969. Pp. 65.
  3. ^ Philip Morgan. Fascism in Europe, 1919-1945. London, England, UK: Routledge, 2003. Pp. 76-77.
  4. ^ Stanley G. Payne. A history of fascism, 1914-1945. Oxon, England, UK: Routledge, 2005. Pp. 269.
  5. ^ Philip Morgan. Fascism in Europe, 1919-1945. London, England, UK: Routledge, 2003. Pp. 76.
  6. ^ F. L. Carsten. The rise of fascism. Berkeley and Los Angeles, California, USA: University of California Press, 1982. Pp. 173.
  7. ^ Peter F. Sugar, Péter Hanák. A History of Hungary. First paperback edition. Bloomington, Indiana, USA: Indiana University Press, 1994. Pp. 341.
  8. ^ a b c Georgi Karasimeonov. Cleavages, parties, and voters: studies from Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Romania. Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999. Pp. 70.