Passaic County, New Jersey

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Passaic County, New Jersey
Bigfalls14w info.jpg
Seal of Passaic County, New Jersey
Seal
Map of New Jersey highlighting Passaic County
Location in the state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location in the U.S.
Founded February 7, 1837[1]
Seat Paterson[2]
Largest city Paterson (population)
West Milford (area)
Area
 • Total 197.10 sq mi (510 km2)
 • Land 184.59 sq mi (478 km2)
 • Water 12.51 sq mi (32 km2), 6.35%
Population
 • (2010) 501,226[3]
 • Density 2,709/sq mi (1,046/km²)
Congressional districts 5th, 9th, 11th
Website www.passaiccountynj.org
Bergen and Passaic counties, 1872

Passaic County (/pəˈs.ɨk/ pə-SAY-ik) is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 501,226,[3] reflecting an increase of 12,177 (+2.5%) from the 489,049 counted in the 2000 Census,[4] retaining its position as the state's ninth-most populous county.[5][6] Its county seat is Paterson.[7][2] It is part of the New York City Metropolitan Area. The most populous place was Paterson, with 146,199 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, more than 29% of the county's population, while West Milford Township, covered 80.32 square miles (208.0 km2), the largest total area of any municipality, more than 40% of the county's area.[6]

Passaic County was created on February 7, 1837, from portions of both Bergen County and Essex County.[1]

Geography[edit]

The highest point is any one of six areas on Bearfort Ridge in West Milford Township at approximately 1,480 feet (450 m) above sea level.[8] The lowest elevation is approximately 20 feet (6.1 m) along the Passaic River in Clifton.[citation needed]

The southeastern, more populous half of the county is either flat near the river or mildly hilly. The northwestern section is rugged and mountainous.

According to the 2010 Census, the county had a total area of 197.10 square miles (510.5 km2), of which 184.59 square miles (478.1 km2) of it (93.7%) was land and 12.51 square miles (32.4 km2) of it (6.35%) was water.[6][9]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 16,734
1850 22,569 34.9%
1860 29,013 28.6%
1870 46,416 60.0%
1880 68,860 48.4%
1890 105,046 52.6%
1900 155,202 47.7%
1910 215,902 39.1%
1920 259,174 20.0%
1930 302,129 16.6%
1940 309,353 2.4%
1950 337,093 9.0%
1960 406,618 20.6%
1970 460,782 13.3%
1980 447,585 −2.9%
1990 453,060 1.2%
2000 489,049 7.9%
2010 501,226 2.5%
Est. 2012 502,885 [10][11] 0.3%
Historical sources: 1790-1990[12]
1970-2010[6] 2000[4] 2010[3] 2000-2010[13]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 501,226 people, 166,785 households, and 120,919 families residing in the county. The population density was 2,715.3 per square mile (1,048.4 /km2). There were 175,966 housing units at an average density of 953.3 per square mile (368.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the county was 62.65% (314,001) White, 12.83% (64,295) Black or African American, 0.67% (3,348) Native American, 5.01% (25,092) Asian, 0.03% (156) Pacific Islander, 15.11% (75,735) from other races, and 3.71% (18,599) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 37.04% (185,677) of the population.[3]

There were 166,785 households, of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.7% were married couples living together, 17.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.5% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.94 and the average family size was 3.45.[3]

In the county, 24.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 25.7% from 45 to 64, and 12% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.1 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.1 males.[3]

Same-sex couples headed one in 149 households in 2010.[14]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 489,049 people, 163,856 households, and 119,614 families residing in the county. The population density was 2,639 people per square mile (1,019/km²). There were 170,048 housing units at an average density of 918 per square mile (354/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 62.32% White, 13.22% Black or African American, 0.44% Native American, 3.69% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 16.24% from other races, and 4.05% from two or more races. 29.95% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[4][16] Among those who reported their ancestry, 16.6% were of Italian, 9.5% Irish, 8.1% German and 6.2% Polish ancestry according to Census 2000.[16][17]

There were 163,856 households out of which 35.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.50% were married couples living together, 16.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.00% were non-families. 22.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.42.[4]

In the county the population was spread out with 26.10% under the age of 18, 9.30% from 18 to 24, 31.30% from 25 to 44, 21.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 94.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.[4]

The median income for a household in the county was $49,210, and the median income for a family was $56,054. Males had a median income of $38,740 versus $29,954 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,370. About 9.40% of families and 12.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.30% of those under age 18 and 9.20% of those age 65 or over.[16][18]

Law and government[edit]

In Passaic County's commission form of government, the Board of Chosen Freeholders discharge both executive and legislative responsibilities. Seven Freeholders are elected at-large for three-year terms on a staggered basis. A Freeholder Director and Freeholder Deputy Director are elected from among the seven Freeholders at an annual reorganization meeting in January.[19] The Freeholders select a County Administrator who, in the role of chief administrative officer, supervises the day-to-day operation of county government and its departments.

Passaic County operates through six standing committees of the Board of Chosen Freeholders. They are Administration & Finance; Health, Education and Community Affairs; Public Works and Buildings & Grounds; Law & Public Safety; Human Services and Planning and Economic Development. The Freeholders also appoint individuals to departments, agencies, boards and commissions for the effective administration of county government.

As of 2013, Passaic County's Freeholders are:

Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (2014),[26] Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik[27] and Surrogate Bernice Toledo.[28]

Law enforcement at the county level is provided by the Passaic County Sheriff and the Passaic County Prosecutor's Office.

Three federal Congressional Districts cover the county, with most of the northern portion of the county in the 5th District, most of the southern portion of the county in the 9th District and the central portion of the county in the 9th District.[29][30] New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[31] New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[32] New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[33]

The county is part of the 26th, 34th, 35th, 36th, 38th, 39th and 40th Districts in the New Jersey Legislature.[34]

Highlands protection[edit]

The Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act regulates development in portions of Oakland and Mahwah that are included in the New Hersey Highlands geographic region.

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 266,617 registered voters in Passaic County, of which 82,529 (31.0%) were registered as Democrats, 49,852 (18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 134,152 (50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 84 voters registered to other parties.[35] Among the county's 2010 Census population, 53.2% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 70.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[35][36]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 58.8% of the vote here (113,257 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 37.7% (72,552 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (1,586 votes), among the 192,558 ballots cast by the county's 273,483 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.4%.[37] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 53.9% of the vote here (94,962 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 42.7% (75,200 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (1,149 votes), among the 176,303 ballots cast by the county's 254,569 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 69.3.[38]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 50.8% of the vote here (57,010 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 43.2% (48,500 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 3.8% (4,288 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (981 votes), among the 112,278 ballots cast by the county's 262,723 registered voters, yielding a 42.7% turnout.[39]

Municipalities[edit]

labeled outline map of municipalities

Transportation[edit]

NJ Transit's Main Line serves the eastern part of Passaic County, with station stops at Hawthorne, Paterson, Clifton, Passaic and Delawanna.[40] Numerous New Jersey Transit bus routes serve Passaic County as well.[41]

The major highways that travel through Passaic County are Interstate 287, Interstate 80, US Route 202, US Route 46, Route 23, Route 21, Route 20, Route 19, Route 4, Route 3, and the Garden State Parkway.

Education[edit]

Media[edit]

Passaic County is served by New York City-based commercial television & radio stations and New Jersey Network public television.

Points of interest[edit]

Climate and weather[edit]

Paterson, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
3.6
 
38
19
 
 
2.9
 
41
22
 
 
4.1
 
50
30
 
 
4.4
 
62
40
 
 
4.2
 
72
50
 
 
4.4
 
81
60
 
 
4.5
 
86
65
 
 
3.9
 
84
63
 
 
4.8
 
76
55
 
 
4.3
 
64
42
 
 
4.1
 
54
34
 
 
4
 
43
25
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[45]

In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Paterson have ranged from a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) in January to a high of 86 °F (30 °C) in July, although a record low of −11 °F (−24 °C) was recorded in January 1961 and a record high of 105 °F (41 °C) was recorded in September 1953. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.86 inches (73 mm) in February to 4.78 inches (121 mm) in September.[45]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 209. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Passaic County, NJ, National Association of Counties. Accessed January 21, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d e f DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010; 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000; Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 23, 2013.
  5. ^ NJ Labor Market Views, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, March 15, 2011. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, p. 6, CPH-2-32. United States Census Bureau, August 2012, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 31, 2013. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  8. ^ New Jersey County High Points, Peakbagger.com. Accessed October 5, 2013.
  9. ^ Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Counties, United States Census Bureau, Backed up by the Internet Archive as of June 11, 2012. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  10. ^ PEPANNRES: Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  11. ^ State & County QuickFacts for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  12. ^ Forstall, Richard L. Population of states and counties of the United States: 1790 to 1990 from the Twenty-one Decennial Censuses, pp. 108-109. United States Census Bureau, March 1996. ISBN 9780934213486. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  13. ^ U.S. Census Bureau Delivers New Jersey's 2010 Census Population Totals, United States Census Bureau, February 3, 2011. Accessed February 5, 2011.
  14. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  15. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ a b c Tables DP-1 to DP-4 from Census 2000 for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 6, 2008. Accessed October 1, 2013.
  17. ^ DP-2 - Profile of Selected Social Characteristics: 2000 from the Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  18. ^ DP-3 - Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: 2000 from Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  19. ^ Clerk-Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  20. ^ Bruce James, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  21. ^ Theodore O. Best Jr., Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  22. ^ Terry Duffy, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  23. ^ Pat Lepore, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  24. ^ Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  25. ^ Patberg, Zach. "Democrats take full control of Passaic County freeholder board", The Record (Bergen County), January 4, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Ronda Casson Cotroneo, a family law attorney, wants [to] establish a program that links lawyers and counselors with victims of domestic violence. John Bartlett, also a lawyer, imagines more parks, calling them the county’s 'undiscovered gem.'... Lora, a Passaic city councilman, says better communication with constituents is the key to good government, whether through handshakes or social media."
  26. ^ County Clerk, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  27. ^ Richard H. Berdnik, Passaic County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  28. ^ County Surrogate, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  29. ^ 2012 Congressional Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  30. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2011. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  31. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  32. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  33. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  34. ^ 2011 Legislative Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  35. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Passaic, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  36. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  37. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  38. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  39. ^ 2009 Governor: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  40. ^ Main/Bergen-Port Jervis Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Passaic ounty Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  42. ^ President's Message, Passaic County Community College. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  43. ^ University Facts, William Paterson University. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  44. ^ At a Glance, Montclair State University. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  45. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Paterson, New Jersey". The Weather Channel. Retrieved October 13, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°02′N 74°18′W / 41.03°N 74.30°W / 41.03; -74.30