Pat Chambers

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Patrick Chambers
Pat Chambers Postgame Interview.jpg
Chambers as Penn State head coach
Sport(s) Basketball
Current position
Title Head coach
Team Penn State
Biographical details
Born (1970-12-13) December 13, 1970 (age 43)
Radnor, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1990–1994 Philadelphia
Position(s) Point guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1995–1996
2001–2004
2004–2009
2009–2011
2011–present
Delaware Valley (asst.)
Philadelphia (asst.)
Villanova (asst.)
Boston University
Penn State
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
America East Tournament Championship (2011)

Patrick "Pat" Chambers (born December 13, 1970) is an American college basketball coach and the current head men's basketball coach at Penn State University. He was hired on June 3, 2011.

Born in Radnor, Pennsylvania, Chambers played collegiate basketball at Philadelphia University. Despite joining the team without a scholarship, he left it as the starting point guard and the team record-holder in assists. He is currently 7th all-time in steals and led the team to four NCAA Division II Sweet 16 appearances and two Elite Eight finishes.[1]

Chambers took over for Dennis Wolff as the head coach at Boston University following the 2008–09 season. He was previously the associate head coach at Villanova University. He started at Villanova as director of operations in May 2004. He was promoted to assistant coach after one season and finally Associate Head Coach in June 2008. Prior to Villanova, Chambers was an assistant at Philadelphia University, Delaware Valley College and Episcopal Academy. In his first season at BU, Chambers led the Terriers to a 21–14 overall record and an 11–5 mark in league play. The Terriers fell just short of an America East Tournament Championship after falling to University of Vermont 83–70 on March 13, 2010. The team did qualify for the 3rd annual College Basketball Invitational and won their first postseason game since 1959. They also hosted the first postseason game in program history, defeating Morehead State University in overtime at Case Gymnasium.

In Chambers' second season at Boston University, he again led the Terriers to a 21-14 overall mark, including a 12-4 mark in conference play. They defeated Stony Brook University at Agganis Arena to win their sixth conference title and clinch an automatic bid into the NCAA Tournament. They received a #16 seed and fell to the #1 seed Kansas Jayhawks in the first round by a score of 72-53. The game marked the Terriers' first appearance in the NCAA tournament since 2002.

Penn State announced Chambers as the 12th head coach in Nittany Lion basketball history in June 2011.[2] He hit the ground running traveling 10,500 miles in his first eight days on the job to visit returning and incoming players and energizing the fan base with his passionate and positive style. He took over a team that returned one starter and just two players with significant playing experience. In his first season, he guided junior guard Tim Frazier to first-team All-Big Ten honors (just the sixth player in program history to earn first team honors) as he produced the second largest scoring improvement in the Big Ten in the past 15 years going from 6.3 ppg as a sophomore to 18.8 ppg as a junior while leading the Big Ten in assists (6.2) and finishing second in scoring and steals (2.4). The Lions posted a 12-20 record and knocked off one ranked opponent (No. 22 Illinois).

Chambers and his wife Courtney have 3 children, Grace, Ryan and Caitlin.

Head coaching record[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Boston University Terriers (America East Conference) (2009–2011)
2009–10 Boston University 21–14 11–5 4th CBI Semifinal
2010–11 Boston University 21–14 12–4 2nd NCAA First Round
Boston University: 42–28 (.600) 23–9 (.719)
Penn State Nittany Lions (Big Ten Conference) (2011–present)
2011–12 Penn State 12–20 4–14 T–11th
2012–13 Penn State 10–20 2–16 12th
2013–14 Penn State 16–18 6–12 T–10th CBI Quarterfinal
Penn State: 38–58 (.396) 12–42 (.222)
Total: 80–86 (.482)

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References[edit]

External links[edit]