Pat Du Pré

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Pat Du Pré
Pat Du Pre.jpg
Country  United States
Residence La Jolla, California
Born (1954-09-16) September 16, 1954 (age 60)
Liège, Belgium
Height 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in)
Turned pro 1972
Retired 1984
Plays Right-handed (1-handed backhand)
Prize money $533,743
Singles
Career record 178-196
Career titles 1
Highest ranking No. 12 (June 9, 1980)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 4R (1980, 1981)
French Open 3R (1983)
Wimbledon SF (1979)
US Open QF (1979)
Doubles
Career record 121-144
Career titles 4
Highest ranking No. 30 (March 3, 1980)

Patrick Du Pré (born September 16, 1954 in Liège, Belgium) is a former professional male tennis player from the United States.

Personal[edit]

While on tour Du Pré resided in La Jolla, California. As of 2012 Du Pré has a wife, Rhonda, and son Joshua, in Savannah, GA.

Of the winning 1973 Stanford tennis team, Du Pré, Roscoe Tanner, and Sandy Mayer were members of the Zeta Psi fraternity.

Tennis career[edit]

Juniors[edit]

While at Mountain Brook High School, he was a three-time Alabama state singles champion. In 1971, he was ranked second in the United States in the boys' 18 singles.

In 1972 Du Pré won the national junior singles championship and was top ranked in both singles and doubles nationally. He attended Stanford University and was an All-American for four years, and in 1973 and 1974, Stanford won two National Collegiate Athletics Association national championships.

Pro tour[edit]

On the professional tour, Du Pré won one ATP Tour singles title (the Hong Kong Open in 1982) and four doubles titles. He grew up in Mountain Brook, Alabama, graduating from Mountain Brook High School. He was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1995[1] and was the first tennis player ever to be brought in.

Du Pré was a semifinalist at Wimbledon in 1979 and a quarter-finalist at the US Open. From 1979 through 1981, he was ranked in the top 20 in the world, reaching as high as World No. 12 in June 1980.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alabama Sports Hall of Fame". Ashof.org. Retrieved January 17, 2013. 

External links[edit]