Patife Band

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Patife Band
Origin São Paulo City, São Paulo, Brazil
Genres Post-punk, experimental rock, art rock, noise rock
Years active 1983-1990
2003
2005-present
Labels Lira Paulistana, WEA
Associated acts Itamar Assumpção, Arrigo Barnabé
Members Paulo Barnabé
André Fonseca
Matheus Leston
Richard Firmino
Gustavo Boni
Past members Sidney Giovenazzi
Maurício Biazzi
James Muller
Cidão Trindade
Eduardo Batistela

Patife Band ("patife" is a word in Portuguese meaning "stooge" or "knucklehead") is a Brazilian post-punk band formed in São Paulo in 1983 by Paulo Barnabé, initially under the name Paulo Patife Band. They are considered to be one of the major exponents of the "Vanguarda Paulistana" movement. Characterized by its heavily experimental and almost non-descript musical style, that uses dodecaphonism and atonalism as main principles of composition and flirts with many different genres such as jazz, punk rock, traditional Brazilian music and popular music, it was favorably compared to American band Pere Ubu,[1] and one critic at some point called their sound "a crossing between King Crimson and Fear".[2]

The band was disestablished in 1990, but reformed briefly in 2003 with a new line-up and releasing a live album. In 2005, it was reformed again with yet another line-up, and since then they make sporadic shows around São Paulo.

History[edit]

Heavily influenced by the style of Itamar Assumpção,[3] Patife Band was founded in São Paulo in 1983, initially as Paulo Patife Band, by Paulo Barnabé (the younger brother of Brazilian actor and musician Arrigo Barnabé), André Fonseca, Sidney Giovenazzi and James Muller. Muller, however, left the band one year later, and was replaced by Cidão Trindade. In the same year, they simplified their name to only Patife Band.

In 1985, Patife Band released their first work, a self-titled EP, via independent label Lira Paulistana Records, containing the songs "Tijolinho" (a Bobby di Carlo cover), "Tô Tenso" (that was covered by Ratos de Porão) and a cover of the traditional Christmas song "Silent Night", among others. In the following year, two songs by them, "Pregador Maldito" and an early version of "Poema em Linha Reta", appeared in the soundtrack of the film Cidade Oculta, which starred Paulo's brother Arrigo.[1]

Their first and only studio album, Corredor Polonês, was released in 1987 via WEA. Included in it, among others, are "Poema em Linha Reta" (a poem by Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa set to music), "Vida de Operário" (a Excomungados cover), "Teu Bem" (covered by Cássia Eller) and "Corredor Polonês" (also covered by Ratos de Porão). After a short tour to promote the album, the band ended in 1990.[1]

After a 13-year hiatus, Patife Band was briefly re-established in 2003 with a different line-up — Maurício Biazzi replaced former bassist Sidney Giovenazzi and Eduardo Batistela replaced drummer Cidão Trindade —, and played at the Festival Demo Sound in Londrina, Paraná. A live album of their performance in the festival, simply titled Ao Vivo, was released in the same year, and is available for streaming at the band's official Myspace.

In 2005, the band reunited once more, with yet another different line-up, and have been doing sporadic shows ever since.

Two of their tracks were featured in the compilation album The Sexual Life of the Savages, released in 2005 by British label Soul Jazz Records. It is worth noting that a picture of Paulo Barnabé was used as the compilation's cover.

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Extended plays[edit]

Live albums[edit]

  • Ao Vivo (2003)

Compilations[edit]

Featured the songs "Teu Bem" and "Poema em Linha Reta".

Band members[edit]

Current members[edit]

  • Paulo Barnabé — vocals (1983–1990, 2003, 2005–)
  • André Fonseca — guitars (1983–1990, 2003, 2005)
  • Matheus Leston — synthesizers (2005–)
  • Richard Firmino — alto sax (2005–)
  • Gustavo Boni — bass (2005–)

Former members[edit]

  • Sidney Giovenazzi — bass (1983–1990)
  • Maurício Biazzi — bass (2003)
  • James Muller — drums (1983–1984)
  • Cidão Trindade — drums (1984–1990)
  • Eduardo Batistela — drums (2003)

References[edit]

External links[edit]