Patrice Brisebois

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Patrice Brisebois
Portrait of Patrice Brisebois
Brisebois in 2011
Born (1971-01-27) January 27, 1971 (age 43)
Montreal, QC, CAN
Height 6 ft 2 in (188 cm)
Weight 209 lb (95 kg; 14 st 13 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Right
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Colorado Avalanche
NHL Draft 30th overall, 1989
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 1991–2009

Joseph Jean-Guy Patrice Brisebois (born January 27, 1971) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman who played for the Montreal Canadiens and Colorado Avalanche, playing nearly 900 games with the former and 1,009 games overall. Brisebois was recently the Canadiens' Director of Player Development.

NHL playing career[edit]

Brisebois was drafted by the Montreal Canadiens in the second round, 30th overall, of the 1989 NHL Entry Draft. He played junior hockey for the Laval Titan and Drummondville Voltigeurs of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL), and for the Fredericton Canadiens of the American Hockey League (AHL) during his first year of professional ice hockey. Brisebois's junior career was an unqualified success. In 1990–91, he captured the Emile Bouchard Trophy awarded to the best defencemen in the QMJHL, was named to the QMJHL All-Star team, and took home the award for the Canadian Hockey League (CHL)'s Best Defencemen.

He has played for the Canadiens for 14 seasons, winning one Stanley Cup with the franchise during the 1992–93 season. By 1999, Brisebois had become a staple of the Habs defence, specifically as their power play anchor. Brisebois was rewarded for his strong play with a hefty $12 millions/3 years contract.

Brisebois soon thereafter began to have a falling out with the general Montreal public. With his hefty contract came a plethora of expectations and the general consensus was that Brisebois was not living up to his pay. Furthermore, Brisebois's risky style as an offensive defenceman became a heated topic of interest.

As a free agent following the NHL lockout in 2004–05, Brisebois left the Canadiens to sign with the Colorado Avalanche in a two-year deal on August 3, 2005.[1] Away from the previous pressures, Brisebois then enjoyed a career year statistically scoring a career-high 38 points with the Avalanche in the 2005–06 season.[2]

On August 3, 2007, Brisebois, again a free agent, returned to the Montreal Canadiens accepting a one-year incentive laden deal for the 2007–08 season.[3][4] At the end of the 2008 season the Habs extended Brisebois to further one-year deal.[5]

Brisebois played his 1000th Career NHL game for the Montreal Canadiens on March 14, 2009 at the Bell Centre against the New Jersey Devils.[6] This feat was not really acknowledged during the night because Martin Brodeur reached Patrick Roy's 551 victories. However, he was awarded a prize from the vice-president of the NHL as well as a silver stick given to him by Henri Richard.

On September 24, 2009, Brisebois announced his retirement after an 18-year career in the National Hockey League.[7] On the same day, he also received the Jean-Béliveau Trophy awarded annually to a Canadiens player for his contribution in the community.[8] Brisebois ranks third all-time in games played for the Canadiens as a defenceman, lacing up 896 times.

NASCAR Canada career[edit]

Brisebois was not signed for the 2009-2010 NHL season as of the summer of 2009. He decided to buy a NASCAR Canada car and race in two NASCAR Canada races in August 2009.[9]

Brisebois entered the NASCAR Canadian Tire Series 2009 GP3R 100, the Grand Prix of Trois-Rivieres, and pulled out before the end due to heat exhaustion.[10]

Brisebois qualified in 15th for the 2009 NASCAR Canada Canadian Tire series NAPA AutoPro 100 on Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, a support race for the NASCAR Nationwide NAPA Auto Parts 200. He finished in 12th place.[11][12]

Front Office Career[edit]

On June 13, 2012 the Montreal Canadiens announced that Brisebois had joined the organization as Director of Player Development. On July 17, 2014, Brisebois stepped down from his position as Director of Player Development, citing family reasons.[13]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1987–88 Laval Titan QMJHL 48 10 34 44 95 6 0 2 2 2
1988–89 Laval Titan QMJHL 50 20 45 65 95 17 8 14 22 45
1989–90 Laval Titan QMJHL 56 18 70 88 108 13 7 9 18 26
1990–91 Drummondville Voltigeurs QMJHL 54 17 44 61 72 14 6 18 24 49
1990–91 Montreal Canadiens NHL 10 0 2 2 4
1991–92 Fredericton Canadiens AHL 53 12 27 39 51
1991–92 Montreal Canadiens NHL 26 2 8 10 20 11 2 4 6 6
1992–93 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 10 21 31 79 20 0 4 4 18
1993–94 Montreal Canadiens NHL 53 2 21 23 63 7 0 4 4 6
1994–95 Montreal Canadiens NHL 35 4 8 12 26
1995–96 Montreal Canadiens NHL 69 9 27 36 65 6 1 2 3 6
1996–97 Montreal Canadiens NHL 49 2 13 15 24 3 1 1 2 24
1997–98 Montreal Canadiens NHL 79 10 27 37 67 10 1 0 1 0
1998–99 Montreal Canadiens NHL 54 3 9 12 28
1999–00 Montreal Canadiens NHL 54 10 25 35 18
2000–01 Montreal Canadiens NHL 77 15 21 36 28
2001–02 Montreal Canadiens NHL 71 4 29 33 25 10 1 1 2 2
2002–03 Montreal Canadiens NHL 73 4 25 29 32
2003–04 Montreal Canadiens NHL 71 4 27 31 22 11 2 1 3 4
2004–05 Kloten Flyers NLA 10 3 1 4 2
2005–06 Colorado Avalanche NHL 80 10 28 38 55 9 0 1 1 4
2006–07 Colorado Avalanche NHL 33 1 10 11 22
2007–08 Montreal Canadiens NHL 43 3 8 11 26 10 1 5 6 6
2008–09 Montreal Canadiens NHL 62 5 13 18 19 1 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 1009 98 322 420 623 98 9 23 32 76

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Avalanche adds Patrice Brisebois to blueline". avalanche.nhl.com. 2005-08-03. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  2. ^ "Patrice Brisebois' hockey statistics profile". hockeydb.com. 2009-09-24. Retrieved 2009-09-24. 
  3. ^ "No place like home". canadiens.nhl.com. 2007-08-03. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  4. ^ "Patrice Brisebois has short memory". one-timer.blogspot.com. 2007-08-03. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  5. ^ "Brisebois back for another year". canadiens.nhl.com. 2008-09-12. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  6. ^ "Brisebois gears up for 1,000th game". montrealgazette.com. 2009-03-14. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  7. ^ "Brisebois tearfully announces end of 18-year NHL career". TSN. 2009-09-24. Retrieved 2009-09-24. 
  8. ^ "Brisebois honoured at Bell Centre". The Montreal Gazette. 2009-09-24. Retrieved 2009-09-24. 
  9. ^ CanWest News Service, "Brisebois trades in skates for autos to pursue NASCAR career", 25 July 2009
  10. ^ TSN GP3R 100 race coverage
  11. ^ Canadian Press, "Fitzpatrick edges series leader Ranger to win NASCAR Canadian Tire race", 30 August 2009
  12. ^ Fradette, Luc (29 August 2009). "NASCAR Canadian Tire: Alex Tagliani takes pole in Montreal". Auto123.com. 
  13. ^ Canadian Press (July 17, 2014). "Patrice Brisebois leaving Canadiens' front office". CBC News. Retrieved July 22, 2014. 

External links[edit]