Patricia Etteh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Patricia Olubunmi Foluke Etteh
Representative for Ayedaade/Isokan/Irewole
Incumbent
Assumed office
2007
Constituency Ayedaade/Isokan/Irewole
Speaker of the House of Representatives of Nigeria
In office
6 June 2007 – 30 October 2007
Deputy Babangida Nguroje
Preceded by Aminu Bello Masari
Succeeded by Dimeji Bankole
Personal details
Born 17 August 1953
Political party AD, then PDP
Spouse(s) Married
Children Two
Residence Isale Popo, Ikire
Profession Hairdresser, beauty therapist & politician

Patricia Olubunmi Foluke Etteh (born 17 August 1953)[1] was the Speaker of the Nigerian House of Representatives from June until October 2007.

Personal life and education[edit]

Etteh, a Yoruba,[2] was born on 17 August 1953.[1][3] She trained as a hairdresser[4] and beauty therapist, but she also earned a law degree from University of Abuja.[3]

Political career[edit]

Etteh represents the Ayedaade/Isokan/Irewole constituency in Osun State[3] She was initially elected in 1999 as an Alliance for Democracy (AD) member, but switched to the People's Democratic Party (PDP) when running for re-election in 2003.[1] She was elected to the position of speaker unanimously in June 2007, and is the only woman to have held this position in the Nigerian government.[5]

Corruption scandal[edit]

In September 2007, she faced a committee of MPs over accusations that she had authorised the spending of 628 million Naira (about US$5 million) on renovations of her official residence and that of her deputy, and the purchase of 12 official cars meant for the House of Representatives. Accusations of theft were chanted at her as she tried to speak in the House, and she was escorted out by security as the situation degenerated into a commotion,[6] though she has not been officially indicted.

The PDP officially continued to back Etteh, although some members, such as Isyaku Ibrahim, criticised this stance.[7] Author and academic Wole Soyinka was among those who called for her resignation,[8] while former President and PDP member Olusegun Obasanjo continued to support her.[9] On 30 October, following weeks of pressure, Etteh resigned her position as speaker.[10] Her deputy, Babangida Nguroje, also resigned.[11] However at the last seating of the 6th session House of Representatives, it was agreed that "There is no record or proceedings of the House where Patricia Olubunmi Etteh was ever indicted," [12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Etteh moves birthday party to US". Nigerian Tribune online. African Newspapers of Nigeria. 15 August 2007. Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2007. 
  2. ^ Bamidele, Yemi (19 September 2007). "Adedibu - 'Etteh is Yorubas' Only Hope'". Daily Trust (Media Trust Limited, via allAfrica.com). Retrieved 20 October 2007. 
  3. ^ a b c "Honourable Patricia Etteh". NassNig.org. National Assembly of Nigeria. Archived from the original on 12 October 2007. Retrieved 7 October 2007. 
  4. ^ Odili, Paul (26 September 2007). "Why Etteh should stand down". Vanguard (Vanguard Media). Retrieved 7 October 2007. [dead link]
  5. ^ "Mark, Etteh, emerge Senate President, Speaker". IndependentNGonline.com. Daily Independent. 6 June 2007. Archived from the original on 25 October 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2007. 
  6. ^ "Nigerian MPs brawl over speaker". BBC News (BBC). 20 September 2007. Retrieved 14 October 2007. 
  7. ^ Izang, Atang (7 October 2007). "Etteh - PDP Endorsed Corruption - Isyaku Ibrahim". Leadership (Leadership Newspapers Group, via allAfrica.com). Retrieved 14 October 2007. 
  8. ^ Ekenna, Geoffrey (5 October 2007). "Resign, Soyinka tells Etteh". The Punch. Retrieved 7 October 2007. 
  9. ^ Nyam, Philip. "Etteh: Countdown To 16 October". Leadership (Leadership Newspapers Group). Retrieved 14 October 2007. [dead link]
  10. ^ "Nigeria's parliamentary speaker quits over corruption scandal", Associated Press (International Herald Tribune), 30 October 2007.
  11. ^ "Index". BBC News. 
  12. ^ "Nigeria speaker goes in graft row", BBC News, 30 October 2007.