Patrick Hicks

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Patrick Hicks (born 1970 Charlotte, North Carolina ) is an American writer, poet, and Writer-in-Residence at Augustana College.

Life[edit]

From Stillwater, Minnesota, much of his fiction takes place in the Midwest, but his poetry often discusses his experiences in Northern Ireland, Germany, and Spain. Hicks is a dual citizen of the United States and Ireland. He holds degrees from College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University, DePaul University, Queen's University of Belfast (Northern Ireland), and the University of Sussex (England).

Patrick Hicks is the author of seven poetry collections, most recently Adoptable and This London-—he is also the editor of A Harvest of Words, which was funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. His work has appeared in some of the most vital literary journals in America, including Ploughshares,[1]Glimmer Train,[2] The Missouri Review, Tar River Poetry, Salon, Prairie Schooner, and many others. He has been nominated seven times for the Pushcart Prize, he was recently a finalist for the High Plains Book Award, the Dzanc Short Story Collection Competition, and the Gival Press Novel Award. His work with PBS’s “Over South Dakota” was nominated for an Emmy. A winner of the Glimmer Train Fiction Award, he is also the recipient of a number of grants, including individual artist awards from the Bush Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council. In 2014, his first novel, The Commandant of Lubizec,[3] was published by Steerforth/Random House to great critical and popular acclaim. In early 2015, his short story collection, The Collector of Names, will be published by Schaffner Press.

He currently lives in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Works[edit]

Fiction[edit]

  • The Commandant of Lubizec: A Novel of the Holocaust and Operation Reinhard (Steerforth/Random House, 2014).

Poetry[edit]

  • Adoptable (Salmon Poetry, 2014)
  • A Harvest of Words, Editor (Center for Western Studies Press, 2010)
  • This London (Salmon Poetry, 2010).
  • Finding the Gossamer (Salmon Poetry, 2008)
  • The Kiss That Saved My Life (2007)
  • Traveling Through History (2005)
  • Draglines (2006)
  • Traveling Through History (2005)

Non-fiction[edit]

  • Brian Moore and the Meaning of the Past – a critical retrospective of the work of Irish-Canadian novelist Brian Moore

References[edit]