Patrick Star

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Patrick Star
SpongeBob SquarePants character
Patrick Star
Patrick Star
First appearance "Help Wanted" (1999)
Created by Stephen Hillenburg
Voiced by Bill Fagerbakke
Information
Species Starfish
Gender Male
Relatives Parents: Herb and Margie[1]
Cousins: Gary[2]
Sister: Sam[3]
Ancestors: Patar[4]
Patrick Revere[5]
Pecos Patrick[5]

Patrick Star is a fictional character in the American animated television series SpongeBob SquarePants. He is voiced by actor Bill Fagerbakke, and first appeared on television in the series' pilot episode "Help Wanted" on May 1, 1999. Patrick was created and designed by marine biologist and animator Stephen Hillenburg.

Depicted as an overweight, dimwitted pink starfish, Patrick lives under a rock in the underwater city of Bikini Bottom next door to Squidward Tentacles' moai. His most significant character trait is his lack of common sense, which sometimes makes him a negative influence on his best friend, SpongeBob SquarePants. He is unemployed, but on some occasions working at the Krusty Krab, a local fast food restaurant, in a variety of positions.

The character has received positive reactions from critics and fans alike; however, he has been involved in several public controversies, including one centered around speculation over his relationship with SpongeBob. Patrick has been included in various SpongeBob SquarePants-related merchandise, including trading cards, video games, plush toys and comic books.

Role in SpongeBob SquarePants[edit]

Patrick is the loveably ignorant best friend of main character SpongeBob SquarePants. He is portrayed as being an overweight, dimwitted, pink starfish residing in the underwater city of Bikini Bottom.[6] Patrick has been shown to make many ludicrous mistakes; despite this, he has occasionally been portrayed as a savant, with articulate observance to certain subjects in specific detail. However, he always reverts quickly back to his usual, unintelligent self after displaying a moment of wisdom.[7] He holds no form of occupation except for several very brief stints working at the Krusty Krab in a variety of positions,[8] and mostly spends his time either clowning around with SpongeBob or lounging beneath the rock under which he resides.

At home, Patrick is typically depicted either sleeping, watching TV, or engaged in the "art of doing nothing", at which he is apparently an expert.[9] All the furnishings in the space under his rock are made of sand, and Patrick can simply opt to quickly build up furniture as needed; even so, his living space is sparse and contains only the barest essentials.[1] Aside from best friend SpongeBob, who is often impressed by Patrick's capacity to come up with naïve yet genius plans or solutions, Patrick frequently irritates those around him and is confounded by the simplest of questions or subjects. The characters of Mr. Krabs and Squidward Tentacles have no patience for Patrick's stupidity, and do not pay him much regard.[10] Sandy Cheeks often gets annoyed by Patrick, but still sees him as a friend.[11]

Character[edit]

Creation and design[edit]

Early drawings of Patrick from Stephen Hillenburg's series bible.

Stephen Hillenburg first became fascinated with the ocean and began developing his artistic abilities as a child. During college, he majored in marine biology and minored in art. He planned to return to college eventually to pursue a master's degree in art. After graduating in 1984, he joined the Ocean Institute, an organization dedicated to educating the public about marine science and maritime history.[12][13] While he was there, he initially had the idea that would lead to the creation of SpongeBob SquarePants: a comic book titled The Intertidal Zone.[14] In 1987, Hillenburg left the institute to pursue a career in animation.[14][15]

A few years after studying experimental animation at the California Institute of the Arts,[15] Hillenburg met Joe Murray, creator of Rocko's Modern Life, at an animation festival, and was offered a job as a director of the series.[14][16][17][18] While working on Rocko's Modern Life, Hillenburg met writer Martin Olson, who saw his The Intertidal Zone comic.[13] Olson liked the idea and suggested that Hillenburg create a TV series focused on marine animals. It prompted him to create SpongeBob SquarePants and said, "It was the inspiration for the show".[13] Rocko's Modern Life ended in 1996.[19] Shortly afterwards, Hillenburg began working on SpongeBob SquarePants.[13]

For the show's characters, Hillenburg started to draw and used character designs from his comic book—including starfish, crab, and sponge.[13] Described by show creator as "probably the dumbest guy in town",[20] Patrick was conceived as a starfish to embody the animal's nature: starfish look "dumb and slow", but in reality, they are "very active and aggressive".[21] Hillenburg incorporated character comedy rather than topical humor on the show to emphasize "things that are more about humourous situations and about characters and their flaws."[22] He designed Patrick, along with SpongeBob, as such because, "[He is] whipping [himself] up into situations—that's always where the humor comes from. The rule is: Follow the innocence and avoid topical [humor]."[23]

In spite of being depicted as having a good temperament or state of mind, Patrick has been shown in some episodes to have a tantrum. Patrick's emotional outbreak was written only for the first season episode "Valentine's Day", where SpongeBob and Sandy try to give Patrick a Valentine's Day gift, and "was supposed to be a one-time thing".[24] However, according to episode writer Jay Lender, "when that show came back it felt so right that his dark side started popping up everywhere. You can plan ahead all you want, but the characters eventually tell you who they are."[24] Every main characters in the show has its own unique footstep sound. The sound of Patrick's footsteps is recorded by the show's Foley crew, with a Foley talent wearing a slip-on shoe. Jeff Hutchins, show's sound designer said, "[Going] barefoot makes it tough to have much presence, so we decided that Patrick would be performed with shoes on."[25]

Voice[edit]

Steve Hillenburg actually played for me a portion of Tom [Kenny]'s performance as the character, and they were looking for a counterpoint. And I do the big dumb stuff. That's my deal ... that's what I do [sic]. It was such a neat experience. Typically, when you audition for any kind of voiceover stuff, you're in a studio, but as I remember it, this was, like, in a weird conference room somewhere, and he had one of those little old cassette decks that’s about half the size of a shoebox, and there was something so endearing about it.

Fagerbakke, on his audition for the role.[26]

Patrick's voice is provided by actor Bill Fagerbakke, who also does the voices of numerous other characters on SpongeBob SquarePants. While creating the show and writing its pilot episode in 1997, Hillenburg and Derek Drymon, the show's then-creative director, were also conducting auditions to find voices for the show's characters.[27] Fagerbakke auditioned for the role of Patrick after Tom Kenny, SpongeBob's voice actor, had been cast. Fagerbakke said, "Steve is such a lovely guy, and I had absolutely no feeling for the material whatsoever." He described his experience in the audition, saying "I was just going in for another audition, and I had no idea what was in store there in terms of the remarkable visual wit and really the kind of endearing child-like humanity in the show. I couldn't pick that up from the audition material at all. I was just kind of perfunctorially trying to give the guy what he wanted."[26]

Fagerbakke referred Patrick as "AquaDauber" (a reference to his role as Michael "Dauber" Dybinski on the 1990s sitcom Coach)[28] in the first few years of working on the show.[29] Patrick is "enormously entertaining to portray" because, according to Fagerbakke, "when I'm performing Patrick, there are many secrets that I could never divulge".[30] Fagerbakke's approach in voicing Patrick is "much the same way I would do [to] any kind of character."[26] "I'm always looking for opportunities to explore that freewheeling imagination and insanity of children. To be able to plug in to that and let that carry you in to a performance is such a gas, I have so much fun with that. I love kids; I raised two girls and I love being a parent," he said.[29] The cast members record as a whole cast, which Fagerbakke describes, "It works so much better." He says that the situation improves his performance as a voice actor because "there is something remarkable that happens when people are working together that is unique to that."[29]

Fagerbakke has been compared to Patrick's character, which he concurs with. Kenny said that "Bill [Fagerbakke] is a big guy. The world is almost too small for him. He's a force of nature, like Patrick."[31] Writer Jay Lender said, describing Fagerbakke in the recording studio, "Bill Fagerbakke is the most thoughtful performer I've ever seen in the booth—he was always asking questions and really trying to get into the mindset, such as it is, of Patrick."[24] Fagerbakke said, "I'm clumsy. I'm goofy. I make mistakes all the time" and agreed that "I guess I'm a lot of Patrick."[30]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Critical reception for the character from both professionals and fans has been positive. In his DVD review for DVD Verdict, Bill Treadway called Patrick "the village idiot, who sometimes gives SpongeBob some really bad advice, but he is a loyal friend and that's something we don't see much of these days." He said, "Patrick is the definition of stupid and his antics will have you laughing out loud."[32] In a review published in 2007, Peter Keepnews of The New York Times said, "Patrick is a popular character, and the new episodes illustrate why: He is unfailingly enthusiastic, touchingly loyal and absolutely undeterred by his intellectual limitations. Hilariously voiced by Bill Fagerbakke, he is not just an endearing comic creation but a role model for idiots everywhere."[33]

Nancy Basile of About.com called Patrick "one of the silliest characters on SpongeBob SquarePants". In her "SpongeBob and Friends: Patrick SquarePants", a Patrick-themed SpongeBob SquarePants home video release, DVD review, Basile said, "The episodes included [sic] are hilarious. They're not only some of Patrick's best episodes, but also some of the show's classic episodes." She ranked "That's No Lady" as Patrick's best episode and said, "I was remiss not to include this episode in my top ten [SpongeBob SquarePants episodes] list." She cited her favorite scene from the episode, "Patrick can't read the number on Mr. Krabs' table, saying, 'Ford knee.' Mr. Krabs replies, 'That's a seven, Patricia.'"[34] The Kids' Choice Awards, an annual awards show presented by Nickelodeon, added several new categories, including "Favorite Animated Animal Sidekick", in its 2014 ceremony.[35] Patrick received the Kids' Choice Award Blimp for the category, winning to Perry the Platypus (Phineas and Ferb), Sparky (The Fairly OddParents) and Waddles (Gravity Falls).[36]

Criticism and controversy[edit]

In 2002, the show popularity among the gay community grew, and it was reported that they had embraced the show, according to BBC Online.[37] The Wall Street Journal also raised questions about SpongeBob and Patrick in a recent article that pointed up the show's popularity in the gay community.[38] Tom Kenny, in response to the article, said "[I] felt the insinuation was a stretch."[38] "I had heard that gay viewers enjoy the show in the same way that lots of people—college students, parents and children—like the show [...] I thought it was rather silly to hang an entire article on that. I don't think it's a case of it being a gay-friendly show—It's a human-being-friendly show. They're all welcome," Kenny said.[38] Hillenburg responded about the SpongeBob's sexual orientation, saying SpongeBob is "[a] cheerful character [but] is not gay."[37]

In 2005, a promotional video that involves SpongeBob promoting diversity and tolerance[39] was criticized by a Christian evangelical group in the United States because they saw the character was being used as an advocate for homosexuality though the video contained "no reference to sex, sexual lifestyle or sexual identity."[40][41] The incident led to questions as to whether or not SpongeBob, his best friend Patrick, and the rest of the series' characters are homosexual characters. After this speculation and comments, Hillenburg repeated his assertion that sexual preference was never considered during the creation of the show.[42] He clarified the issue and said "We never intended them to be gay. I consider them to be almost asexual. We're just trying to be funny and this has got nothing to do with the show."[43][44] Tom Kenny and other production members were shocked and surprised that such an issue had arisen.[45] Derek Drymon, show's creative director, said, "If SpongeBob holds hands with Patrick it's because he's his best friend and he loves him. I think the whole thing is a part of a larger agenda to stigmatize gay people."[27]

Jeffrey P. Dennis, author of the journal article "The Same Thing We Do Every Night: Signifying Same-Sex Desire in Television Cartoons," argued that SpongeBob and Sandy are not romantically in love, while adding that he believed that SpongeBob and Patrick "are paired with arguably erotic intensity." Dennis noted the two are "not consistently coded as romantic partners," since they live in separate residences, and have distinct groups of friends, but claimed that in the series, "the possibility of same-sex desire is never excluded."[46] Martin Goodman of Animation World Magazine described Dennis's comments regarding SpongeBob and Patrick as "interesting."[47]

In other media[edit]

Patrick has appeared in other SpongeBob SquarePants-related media, including board games, comic books, keychains, plush toys, trading cards and video games.[48] Patrick has a major role in The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie, the first feature-length film adaptation of the show. The film was released on November 19, 2004 and has been a financial success, grossing over $140,000,000 worldwide.[49] He is slated to appear in the film's sequel, which is scheduled to be released in theaters on February 6, 2015.[50][51]

In 2009, actor John Fricker portrayed Patrick in the musical adaptation of the third season episode "The Sponge Who Could Fly".[52] Fricker and the musical itself were well received by most critics. Gordon Barr and Roger Domeneghetti of the Evening Chronicle described the musical as "a silly riot of colour [...] as you'd have to expect from an adaptation of a cartoon TV show",[53] while Viv Hardwick of The Northern Echo said that Fricker and Martin Johnston (Mr. Krabs) "win the biggest costume contest.".[54][54] A critic from the Chichester Observer wrote, "John Fricker is in his element as the simple but lovable Patrick Star".[55]

The character of Patrick has become viral in the Internet in the forms of memes or image macros. A still from The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie, which displays Patrick in a drop-jawed look, inspired YouTube user "chadfaceproductions" to create a presentation of Patrick's expression using a number of different filters. Following this, a YouTube user called "K1ngC0rND0G" uploaded another video featuring Patrick reacting to Canadian singer Justin Bieber's 2010 single, "Baby". The meme called "Surprised Patrick" started to disseminate, with one of the first images was posted to Reddit by SeannyOC, and then reblogged onto I Can Has Cheezburger?'s Memebase.[56] Many humor websites—including andPOP,[57] BiteTV,[56] CollegeHumor,[58] Funny or Die,[59] Mashable[60] and Smosh[61]—have published their own "Best of" lists and compilations, covering the "Surprised Patrick" meme's popularity. Mashable's Nena Prakash said, "For years, Patrick Star helped hold down Bikini Bottom while SpongeBob was flippin' burgers at [t]he Krusty Krab. But now it's time for Patrick to come out from under that rock and take a seat upon his royal meme throne, because he's an Internet star(fish)."[60] Another popular meme based on the character is the "Push It Somewhere Else Patrick" image macro, which was taken from the second season episode "Sandy, SpongeBob, and the Worm".[62]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Writers: Aaron Springer, C.H. Greenblatt, Mark O'Hare (November 30, 2001). "I'm with Stupid". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 2. Episode 37b.
  2. ^ Writers: Zeus Cervas, Erik Wiese, Dani Michaeli (February 19, 2007). "Rule of Dumb". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 4. Episode 77b.
  3. ^ Writers: Casey Alexander, Zeus Cervas, Richard Pursel (January 15, 2011). "Big Sister Sam". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 7. Episode 152a.
  4. ^ Writers: Paul Tibbitt, Kent Osborne (March 5, 2004). "Ugh". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 3. Episode 54.
  5. ^ a b Writers: Luke Brookshier, Tom King, Steven Banks, Richard Pursel (April 11, 2008). "Pest of the West". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 5. Episode 96.
  6. ^ Whipp, Glenn (November 19, 2004). "An Absorbing Cinema Debut". Daily News. Los Angeles, CA. Retrieved April 26, 2014.   – via HighBeam (subscription required)
  7. ^ Writers: Luke Brookshier, Tom King, Dani Michaeli (October 6, 2006). "Squidtastic Voyage". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 4. Episode 75a.
  8. ^ Writers: Casey Alexander, Zeus Cervas, Dani Michaeli (July 19, 2009). "No Hat for Pat". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 6. Episode 120a.
  9. ^ Writers: Luke Brookshier, Nate Cash, Eric Shaw (November 23, 2007). "Stanley S. SquarePants". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 5. Episode 100b.
  10. ^ Brown, Clancy. (March 1, 2003). The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (The Absorbing Tale Behind The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment/Nickelodeon.
  11. ^ Writers: C.H. Greenblatt, Kaz, Merriwether Williams (October 4, 2003). "I Had an Accident". SpongeBob SquarePants. Season 3. Episode 56b.
  12. ^ "Welcome to the Ocean Institute". ocean-institute.org. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d e Wilson, Thomas F.(Interviewer); Hillenburg, Stephen (Interviewee) (May 29, 2012). Big Pop Fun #28: Stephen Hillenburg, Artist and Animator–Interview (mp3) (Podcast). Nerdist Industries. Archived from the original on December 21, 2013. Retrieved December 21, 2013. 
  14. ^ a b c Hillenburg, Stephen (2003). The Origin of SpongeBob SquarePants. SpongeBob SquarePants: The Complete First Season (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment. 
  15. ^ a b Banks, Steven (September 24, 2004). SpongeBob Exposed! The Insider's Guide to SpongeBob SquarePants. Gregg Schigiel (Illustrator). New York City, New York: Simon Spotlight/Nickelodeon. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-689-86870-2. 
  16. ^ Murray, Joe (2003). The Origin of SpongeBob SquarePants. SpongeBob SquarePants: The Complete First Season (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment. 
  17. ^ Neuwirth 2003, p. 50
  18. ^ "Lisa (Kiczuk) Trainor interviews Joe Murray, creator of Rocko's Modern Life," The Rocko's Modern Life FAQ
  19. ^ "Rocko's Modern Life". JoeMurrayStudio.com. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  20. ^ Hillenburg, Stephen. (March 1, 2003). The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (The Absorbing Tale Behind The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment/Nickelodeon.
  21. ^ Hillenburg, Stephen. (March 1, 2003). The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (The Case of the Sponge "Bob") (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment/Nickelodeon.
  22. ^ Burnet, Jaime (November 18, 2004). "Movie Interview: The unbearable lightness of SpongeBob". The Gauntlet. Gauntlet Publication Society. Archived from the original on April 27, 2014. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  23. ^ Cavna, Michael (July 14, 2009). "The Interview: 'SpongeBob' Creator Stephen Hillenburg". The Washington Post. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  24. ^ a b c Lender, Jay (2010). "The Oral History of SpongeBob SquarePants". Hogan's Alley #17 (Bull Moose Publishing Corporation). Retrieved September 21, 2012. 
  25. ^ Hutchins, Jeff (2010). "The Oral History of SpongeBob SquarePants". Hogan's Alley #17 (Bull Moose Publishing Corporation). Retrieved September 21, 2012. 
  26. ^ a b c Liu, Ed (November 11, 2013). "Being Patrick Star: Toonzone Interviews Bill Fagerbakke on SpongeBob SquarePants". Toon Zone. Archived from the original on December 19, 2013. Retrieved March 28, 2014. 
  27. ^ a b Drymon, Derek (2010). "The Oral History of SpongeBob SquarePants". Hogan's Alley #17 (Bull Moose Publishing Corporation). Retrieved September 21, 2012. 
  28. ^ Daily Mail Reporter (September 25, 2012). "SpongeBob SquarePants voice actor Bill Fagerbakke files for legal separation from wife". Daily Mail. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  29. ^ a b c Burszan, David (November 11, 2013). "Interview With Bill Fagerbakke: The Voice of Spongebob's Patrick Star". Den of Geek. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  30. ^ a b Fagerbakke, Bill. (November 16, 2010). Legends of Bikini Bottom (Behind the Scenes: Legends of Bikini Bottom) (DVD). Paramount Home Entertainment/Nickelodeon.
  31. ^ Kenny, Tom (2010). "The Oral History of SpongeBob SquarePants". Hogan's Alley #17 (Bull Moose Publishing Corporation). Retrieved September 21, 2012. 
  32. ^ Treadway, Bill (November 10, 2003). "SpongeBob SquarePants: The Complete First Season". DVD Verdict. Retrieved October 29, 2013. 
  33. ^ Keepnews, Peter (February 19, 2007). "Lincoln? Washington? Nope. Patrick!". The New York Times. Retrieved May 1, 2014. 
  34. ^ Basile, Nancy. "'SpongeBob and Friends: Patrick SquarePants'". About.com. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  35. ^ Ng, Philiana (February 24, 2014). "Nickelodeon's Kids' Choice Awards Nominations Revealed". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  36. ^ Couch, Aaron; Washington, Arlene (March 29, 2014). "Nickelodeon's Kids' Choice Awards: The Winners". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  37. ^ a b "People in the news". Knight Ridder. October 9, 2002. Retrieved October 31, 2013.   – via HighBeam (subscription required)
  38. ^ a b c "Tom Kenny finds his voice in the world of cartoons". Chicago Tribune. Chicago, IL. November 25, 2002. Retrieved October 31, 2013.   – via HighBeam (subscription required)
  39. ^ BBC Staff (January 20, 2005). "US right attacks SpongeBob video". BBC News. Retrieved June 11, 2007. 
  40. ^ "Will Spongebob make you gay?". MSNBC. Retrieved January 21, 2005. 
  41. ^ Associated Press (January 22, 2005). "Spongebob, Muppets and the Sister Sledge writer suffer criticism". USA Today. Retrieved June 11, 2007. 
  42. ^ "SpongeBob isn't gay or straight, creator says". Reuters. January 29, 2005. Retrieved November 9, 2008. 
  43. ^ BBC Staff (October 9, 2002). "Camp cartoon star 'is not gay'". BBC News. Retrieved June 11, 2007. 
  44. ^ Silverman, Stephen M. (January 28, 2005). "SpongeBob Asexual, Not Gay: Creator". People. Retrieved August 26, 2009. 
  45. ^ Farhat, Basima (Interviewer) (December 5, 2006). Tom Kenny: Voice of SpongeBob SquarePants – Interview (mp3) (Radio production). The People Speak Radio. Retrieved November 8, 2008. 
  46. ^ Dennis, Jeffrey P. "The Same Thing We Do Every Night: Signifying Same-Sex Desire in Television Cartoons." Journal of Popular Film & Television. Fall 2003. Volume 31, Issue 3. 132-140. 9p, 3bw. Within the PDF document the source info is on p. 137 (6/10)
  47. ^ Goodman, Martin. "Deconstruction Zone — Part 2." Animation World Network. Wednesday March 10, 2004.4. Retrieved on October 28, 2009.
  48. ^
  49. ^ "The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (2004)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  50. ^ "Paramount Dates 'Spongebob Squarepants 2,' 'Monster Trucks' for 2015". The Hollywood Reporter. August 1, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2013. 
  51. ^ Sneider, Jeff (June 5, 2014). "Paramount Avoids Fifty Shades by Moving Up ‘Spongebob Squarepants Sequel". The Wrap. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  52. ^ "Review: Spongebob Squarepants, Theatre Royal". Nottingham Post. April 30, 2009. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  53. ^ Barr, Gordon; Domeneghetti, Roger (April 23, 2009). "A Splashing Show". Evening Chronicle. p. 29. 
  54. ^ a b Hardwick, Viv (April 24, 2009). "Theatre critics". The Northern Echo. p. 25. 
  55. ^ "REVIEW: SpongeBob SquarePants makes a splash at the Mayflower". Chichester Observer. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  56. ^ a b May, Goeff. "30 of the Best Surprised Patrick Memes Ever". BiteTV. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  57. ^ Baladad, Portia (March 16, 2013). "The 10 Best Screaming Patrick Star Memes". andPOP. Channel Zero. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  58. ^ Han, Chris (March 26, 2013). "Patrick Star is in a State of Permanent Shock UPDATED". CollegeHumor. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  59. ^ "20 Funniest Examples of the Surprised Patrick Meme". Funny or Die. April 3, 2013. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  60. ^ a b Prakash, Nena (March 30, 2013). "'Surprised Patrick' Is Shocked by Instant Meme Fame". Mashable. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  61. ^ Editor (2013). "Best Of The Surprised Patrick Meme!". Smosh. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 
  62. ^ Cosmic Charlie (2011). "Best Of The 'Push It Somewhere Else Patrick' Meme!". Smosh. Retrieved April 27, 2014. 

External links[edit]