Patriotic Union (Liechtenstein)

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Patriotic Union
Abbreviation VU
Leader Jakob Büchel
Founded 1936
Preceded by Christian-Social People's Party
Liechtenstein Homeland Service
Headquarters Fürst-Franz-Josef-Strasse 13
FL-9490 Vaduz
Newspaper Liechtensteiner Vaterland[1]
Ideology Christian democracy
Political position Centre-right
European affiliation European Democrat Union
Colours Red
Landtag
8 / 25
Website
vu-online.li
Politics of Liechtenstein
Political parties
Elections

The Patriotic Union (German: Vaterländische Union, VU) is a Christian democratic political party in Liechtenstein.[2] It is led by Jakob Büchel and has eight members in the Landtag.

Together with the Progressive Citizens' Party (FBP), also a centre-right party, the VU dominates the politics of Liechtenstein. The VU is the more liberal of the two parties, advocating constitutional monarchy and greater democracy.[3]

History[edit]

The Patriotic Union was formed by the 1936 merger of the Christian-Social People's Party (VP) with the minor party Liechtenstein Homeland Service (LHD).[4]

While the VP was the larger party, following the merger it was members of the LHD who took prominent positions in the leadership of the new party.[1]

Election history[edit]

After decades of being the second party to the FBP, the VU became the largest party in the Landtag for the first time as a result of the 1970 elections. Although it lost the 1974 elections to the FBP, it won the 1978 elections and retained its Landtag majority until February 1993. However, early elections in October 1993 saw it regain its majority, which it held until 2001. After winning the 2009 elections the party lost the 2013 elections to the FBP.

Election Votes  % Seats +/– Position Government
1936
4 / 15
Increase 4 Increase 2nd Opposition
1939
7 / 15
Increase 3 Steady 2nd Coalition
1945 1,285 45.4
7 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Coalition
1949 1,383 47.1
7 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Coalition
1953 (Feb) 1,229 42.5
7 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Coalition
1953 (Jun) 1,541 49.6
7 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Coalition
1957 1,537 47.6
7 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Coalition
1958 1,537 45.5
6 / 15
Decrease 1 Steady 2nd Coalition
1962 1,448 42.7
7 / 15
Increase 1 Steady 2nd Coalition
1966 1,581 42.8
7 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 2nd Coalition
1970 2,008 49.5
8 / 15
Increase 1 Increase 1st Coalition
1974 16,356 47.3
7 / 15
Decrease 1 Decrease 2nd Coalition
1978 18,244 49.2
8 / 15
Increase 1 Increase 1st Coalition
1982 20,997 53.5
8 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Coalition
1986 46,793 50.1
8 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Coalition
1989 75,417 47.2
13 / 25
Increase 5 Steady 1st Coalition
1993 (Feb) 73,217 45.4
11 / 25
Decrease 2 Decrease 2nd Coalition
1993 (Oct) 78,898 50.1
13 / 25
Increase 2 Increase 1st Coalition
1997 82,786 49.2
13 / 25
Steady 0 Steady 1st Majority
2001 76,402 41.3
11 / 25
Decrease 2 Decrease 2nd Opposition
2005 74,162 38.2
10 / 25
Decrease 1 Steady 2nd Coalition
2009 95,219 47.6
13 / 25
Increase 3 Increase 1st Coalition
2013 65,118 33.5
8 / 25
Decrease 5 Decrease 2nd Coalition

Leaders[edit]

Years Leader
1936–1965 Otto Schaedler
1965–1974 Franz Nägele
1974–1992 Otto Hasler
1992–2001 Oswald Kranz
2001–2005 Heinz Frommelt
2005–2011 Adolf Heeb
2011– Jakob Büchel

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Vaterländische Union". e-archiv.li (in German). Liechtenstein National Archives. Retrieved 22 February 2014. 
  2. ^ Parties and Elections in Europe: The database about parliamentary elections and political parties in Europe, by Wolfram Nordsieck
  3. ^ Day, Alan John (2002). Political parties of the world. London: John Harper. p. 302. ISBN 978-0-9536278-7-5. 
  4. ^ "Parties in Liechtenstein 1921-1943". Prince and People: Liechtenstein Civics (in German). School Office of the Principality of Liechtenstein. 2007. Retrieved 13 February 2014. 

External links[edit]