Paul B. Pieper

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Paul B. Pieper
First Quorum of the Seventy
April 2, 2005 (2005-04-02)
Called by Gordon B. Hinckley
Personal details
Born Paul Bowen Pieper
(1957-10-07) October 7, 1957 (age 57)
Pocatello, Idaho, United States

Paul Bowen Pieper (born October 7, 1957) has been a general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) since 2005. Pieper was the first leader of the LDS Church in Kazakhstan.

Pieper was born in Pocatello, Idaho. As a young man, he served as a missionary for the LDS Church in the Mexico Monterrey Mission, where he became fluent in Spanish. He studied at Brigham Young University and received a bachelor's degree and a Juris Doctor from the University of Utah. He is married to the former Melissa "Lisa" Tuttle of Salt Lake City. She is the daughter of general authority and educator A. Theodore Tuttle. They are the parents of six children.

In the late 1990s, Pieper and his family moved to Kazakhstan, where he learned to speak Russian while working for a law firm in international trade law. Pieper became the branch president and the first-ever leader of the LDS Church in Kazakhstan. By the end of 2003, the Piepers had assisted approximately 50 Kazakhstani people to be baptized into the LDS Church.

In 2004, Pieper was called to be president of the church's Russia St. Petersburg Mission. In April 2005, he was called as a general authority and member of the church's First Quorum of the Seventy. From 2005 to 2009, he served in the presidency of the church's Europe East Area. From 2009 to 2012, he assisted in coordinating the church's Middle East/Africa North Area, administered from the church's headquarters. Since 2011, he has continued service at the church's headquarters, as an executive director, first of the church's Curriculum Department, followed by the Priesthood Department, which includes stewardship for the church's auxiliaries.

On 23 June 2007, Pieper presided over the groundbreaking ceremony for the LDS Church's Kyiv Ukraine Temple in Kiev, Ukraine.

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