Paul DeMarinis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Paul DeMarinis is an American electronic music composer, sound, performance, and computer-based artist.

Education[edit]

DeMarinis received a B.A. in Music and Filmmaking Interdisciplinary from Antioch College. At the college, DeMarinis studied film with Paul Sharits, music with John Ronsheim and philosophy with Keith McGary.[1]

DeMarinis received an M.F.A. in Electronic Music and the Recording Media from Mills College. At the college, DeMarinis studied music composition with Robert Ashley, Terry Riley video with Phillip Makanna.[2]

Career[edit]

DeMarinis' performance pieces and interactive installations have been featured in exhibitions and festivals.[citation needed][3][4] He received the Golden Nica Award for Interactive Art at the Ars Electronica Festival for his installation The Messenger (2003).[5]

In the late 1970s he was a member of the San Francisco Bay Area-based experimental music collective The League of Automatic Music Composers.[6][7]

DeMarinis has investigated abandoned technologies and the history of electronic inventions and telecommunications.[8] Some of his installation works have used optics and computers and featured processed and synthesized speech.[9]

DeMarinis taught computer, video and audio art at Mills College, Wesleyan University, San Francisco State University and the New York State College of Ceramics. He is a Professor of Art at Stanford University in California.[10]

Selected works[edit]

  • "Jiffy_pop" (2013)
  • Pneuma (2010)
  • The Probable Flight Path of AF447 (2010)
  • Around the World (2010)
  • Dust (2009)
  • Early Media goes to the Movies (2008)
  • Hypnica (2007)
  • Rome to Tripoli (2006–2008)
  • A Light Rain (2004) in collaboration with Rebecca Cummins
  • Firebirds (2004)
  • Tongues of Fire (2004)
  • (Tommy Franks) Dérive Quebec (2003)
  • Rebus (2003)
  • Wavescape (2003)
  • According to Scripture (2002)
  • Moondust Memories (2001)
  • Walls in the Air (2001)
  • The Products of Our Industry (2000)
  • Four Foxhole Radios (2000)
  • The Lecture of Comrade Stalin... (1999–2002)
  • RainDance / Musica Acuatica (1998)
  • The Messenger (1998)
  • Grind Snaxe Blind Apes (A Study for Pomeroy's Tomb) (1997)
  • Living with Electricity (1997)
  • Sound Waves and Scan-O-Vision (1996)
  • Gray Matter (1995)
  • Chaotic Jumpropes (1994)
  • The Edison Effect (1989–1993)
  • An Unsettling Matter (1991)
  • Fireflies Alight on the Abacus of Al-Farabi (1989)
  • Alien Voices (1988)
  • Voice Creatures (1986)
  • Music Room / Faultless Jamming (1982)
  • Sound Fountain (1982) In collaboration with David Behrman
  • Sounds and the Shadows of Sounds (1979)
  • A Byte at the Opera (1977) performance with Jim Pomeroy [5]
  • The Pygmy Gamelan (1973)

Discography[edit]

  • A Listener's Companion, Het Apollohuis Compact Disc (Holland), 1995
  • Music as a Second Language, Lovely Music, Ltd. CD 3011, 1991
  • Mind Power, Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine #22, 1989
  • I Want You and Kokole, on "Another Coast: Electronic Music from California," Music & Arts CD 276, 1988
  • Eenie Meenie Chillie Beenie and Yellow Yankee, Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine #9, 1985
  • She's-a-Wild, Record Records RR 101, 1981
  • If God Were Alive (& He Is) You Could Reach Him by Telephone & Forest Booties on Lovely Little Records, Lovely Music, Ltd. LP 101-6, 1980
  • Great Masters of Melody on "Just for the Record," "Blue" Gene Tyranny, keyboards, Lovely Music, Ltd. LP 1062, 1979 [11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Artist bio on SolwayJones gallery website". solwayjonesgallery.com. Retrieved 2010-07-25. 
  2. ^ "Artist bio on SolwayJones gallery website". solwayjonesgallery.com. Retrieved 2010-07-25. 
  3. ^ http://www.23five.org/archives/demarinis.html
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ [2]
  6. ^ [3]
  7. ^ Electronic and Experimental Music: Technology, Music and Culture by Thom Holmes. Google Books. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  8. ^ "Talking Flames and The Boy Mechanic: A Conversation with Paul DeMarinis". ambidextrousmag.com. Retrieved 2010-07-25. 
  9. ^ [4]
  10. ^ "Paul DeMarinis". art.stanford.edu. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  11. ^ "Paul DeMarinis". lovely.com. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 

External links[edit]