Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

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The Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize is given every year since 1952 for investigations in medicine. The prize carries a prize money of 100.000 Euro. The prize awarding ceremony is traditionally on March 14, the birthday of Paul Ehrlich, in the St. Pauls-Church, Frankfurt.

Awarded are researchers from worldwide in medicine-sections, in which Paul Ehrlich worked. Especially this are Immunology, Cancer Research, Haematology, Microbiology and experimental und clinical Chemotherapy.

The prize is given from the Paul-Ehrlich-Stiftung (de) and belongs to the highest endowed and international most distinguished awards in medicine in Germany.

Many of the prizewinners were later Nobel Prize winners.

Prizewinners[edit]

Prizewinners 1952 - 2003[edit]

2004[edit]

For investigations of T-cell-receptors.

2005[edit]

  • Ian Wilmut, Roslin-Institute, Edinburgh, Scotland, -- „Father“ of Dolly

For his experiments of cloning mammalians.

2006[edit]

For the investigations of RNA interference.

2007[edit]

For their achievements respecting structure and function of Ribosomes.

2008[edit]

For his achievements in the discovery of Th1- and Th2-cells.

2009[edit]

For their achievements in the discovery of telomeres and telomerase.

2010[edit]

For his outstanding achievements in the field of Cytokines.

2011[edit]

For his contribution to research in the field of bacterial diseases, including tetanus, botulism, anthrax and Helicobacter pylori associated diseases.

2012[edit]

For his outstanding contributions to research in the field of Cell Biology, especially for the discovery of signal recognizing particles.

2013[edit]

For her outstanding research achievements in the field of human genetics. She was the first to demonstrate that there is a genetic predisposition for breast cancer.

2014[edit]

For his outstanding achievements in the field of antibody research. He has demonstrated how the immune system's B cells are activated and induced to produce antibodies. He has thereby helped to decode the molecular bases of Paul Ehrlich's famous side-chain theory.

References[edit]


External links[edit]