Paul Garabedian

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Paul Garabedian

Paul Roesel Garabedian (August 2, 1927, Cincinnati – May 13, 2010, Manhattan) was an applied mathematician and numerical analyst.[1] Garabedian was the Director-Division of Computational Fluid Dynamics at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University.[2] He is known for his contributions to the fields of computational fluid dynamics and plasma physics (design and optimization of stellarators).[3] He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1975.[4]

Education and career[edit]

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Garabedian received a Bachelor's degree from Brown University in 1946 and a Master's degree from the Harvard University in 1947, both in mathematics. He received his Ph.D., also from Harvard University, in 1948 under the direction of Lars Ahlfors.[5] It was at Brown University that he met his longtime colleague and collaborator, Frances Bauer.[6]

In 1949 Garabedian joined the faculty at the University of California as an Assistant Professor and became Associate Professor in 1952. In 1956, he moved to Stanford University as a Professor of mathematics. In 1959 he moved to the Institute of Mathematical Sciences [later renamed the Courant Institute] at New York University. In 1978 he was appointed the Director-Division of Computational Fluid Dynamics at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University. In a long and fruitful academic career, Garabedian has supervised 27 Ph.D. theses. The first was in 1953 (Edward McLeod) and the last came in 1997 (Connie Chen).

Honors and awards[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Partial Differential Equations, 2nd ed., Chelsea Pub. Co. (1998). ISBN 0-8218-1377-3
  • Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibrium and Stability of Stellarators, with F. Bauer and O. Betancourt. Springer-Verlag (1984). ISBN 0-387-90966-4
  • Supercritical Wing Sections II, with F. Bauer, D. Korn and A. Jameson. Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems, Springer-Verlag (1975).[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]