Paul Ginsparg

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Paul Ginsparg
Ginsparg at Cornell University.jpg
Paul Ginsparg
Born Paul Henry Ginsparg
1955 (age 58–59)[1]
Institutions Cornell University
Alma mater Harvard University (B.A.)
Cornell University (Ph.D.)
Thesis Aspects of Symmetry Behavior in Quantum Field Theory (1981)
Doctoral advisor Kenneth G. Wilson[2]
Known for ArXiv
Notable awards MacArthur Fellowship
Website
people.ccmr.cornell.edu/~ginsparg

Paul Henry Ginsparg (born 1955) is a physicist widely known for his development of the ArXiv.org e-print archive[2][3][4] and for contributions to theoretical physics.

Education[edit]

He is a graduate of Syosset High School, Syosset, New York. He graduated from Harvard University with a Bachelor of Arts in physics, and from Cornell University with a PhD in theoretical particle physics with a thesis titled Aspects of Symmetry Behavior in Quantum Field Theory.

Career in physics[edit]

Ginsparg was a junior fellow and taught in the physics department at Harvard University until 1990.[5] The pre-print archive was developed while he was a member of staff of Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1990–2001. Since 2001, Ginsparg has been a professor of Physics and Computing & Information Science at Cornell University.[6]

He has published physics papers in the areas of quantum field theory, string theory, conformal field theory, and quantum gravity. He often comments on the changing world of physics in the Information Age.[7][8][9][10][11][12]

Awards[edit]

He has been awarded the P.A.M. (Physics-Astronomy-Math) Award from the Special Libraries Association,[13] named a Lingua Franca "Tech 20", elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society, awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2002,[14] received the Council of Science Editors Award for Meritorious Achievement, and received the Paul Evans Peters Award from Educause, ARL, and CNI.[15] He was a Radcliffe Institute Fellow in 2008–2009.[5] He was named a White House Champion of Change June 2013.[16]

Publications[edit]

Family[edit]

He has two children - a daughter, Miryam Ginsparg, and a son, Noam Ginsparg. His wife is Laura Jones.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ GND:1028970773
  2. ^ a b Ginsparg, Paul (2011). "It was twenty years ago today...". arXiv:1108.2700v1.
  3. ^ Ginsparg, P. (2011). "ArXiv at 20". Nature 476 (7359): 145. doi:10.1038/476145a.  edit
  4. ^ http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1137367
  5. ^ a b http://www.radcliffe.edu/fellowships/fellows_2009pginsparg.aspx
  6. ^ http://www.physics.cornell.edu/people/faculty/?page=website/faculty&action=show/id=17
  7. ^ Phony Science: Questions for Paul Ginsparg William Speed Weed, 2002-10-13
  8. ^ "The global-village pioneers" by Paul Ginsparg, on the early days of the web, Physics World, October 1, 2008; see updated and augmented version "It was twenty years ago today ..." (14 Aug 2011)
  9. ^ Is Eternal Vigilance the Price of Freedom? (or Revenge of the Global Village Idiots), a forthcoming invited address by Ginsparg at Wikimania 2006, Cambridge, MA, August 4–6, 2006. NOTE: talk was cancelled due to controversial content.
  10. ^ Read as We May audio for a talk at the Emerging Libraries Conference at Rice University, Mar 6, 2007, 10:30-11:30AM.
  11. ^ Next-Generation Implications of Open Access for CTWatch Quarterly issue on "The Coming Revolution in Scholarly Communications & Cyberinfrastructure", Aug 2007
  12. ^ Next-Generation Implications of Open Access video for a talk at the "Science in the 21st Century conference" at Perimeter Institute, Sep 9, 2008, 11:00-12:00AM.
  13. ^ http://units.sla.org/division/dpam/manual/awards/ginsparg.html
  14. ^ http://www.news.cornell.edu/releases/sept02/ginsparg-MacArthur.ws.html
  15. ^ http://www.educause.edu/About+EDUCAUSE/PressReleases/arXivFounderPaulGinspargReceiv/17095
  16. ^ http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/06/white-house-honors-ginsparg-arxiv

External links[edit]