Paul J. McAuley

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Paul McAuley at Worldcon 2005 in Glasgow

Paul J. McAuley (born 23 April 1955) is a British botanist and award-winning author.

A biologist by training, UK science fiction author McAuley writes mostly hard science fiction, dealing with themes such as biotechnology, alternate history/alternate reality, and space travel.

McAuley began with far-future space opera Four Hundred Billion Stars, its sequel Eternal Light, and the planetary-colony adventure Of the Fall. Red Dust, set on a far-future Mars colonized by the Chinese, is a planetary romance filled with all the latest SF ideas: nanotechnology, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, personality downloads, virtual reality. The Confluence trilogy, set in an even more distant future (about ten million years from now), is one of a number of novels to use Frank J. Tipler's Omega Point Theory (that the universe seems to be evolving toward a maximum degree of complexity and consciousness) as one of its themes.[citation needed] About the same time, he published Pasquale's Angel, set in an alternate Italian Renaissance and featuring Niccolò Machiavegli (Machiavelli) and Leonardo da Vinci as major characters.

McAuley has also used biotechnology and nanotechnology themes in near-future settings: Fairyland describes a dystopian, war-torn Europe where genetically engineered "dolls" are used as disposable slaves. Since 2001 he has produced several SF-based techno-thrillers such as The Secret of Life, Whole Wide World, and White Devils.

Four Hundred Billion Stars, his first novel, won the Philip K. Dick Award in 1988.[1] Fairyland won the 1996 Arthur C. Clarke Award[2] and the 1997 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best SF Novel.[3] "The Temptation of Dr. Stein", won the British Fantasy Award. Pasquale's Angel won the Sidewise Award for Alternate History (Long Form).

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

Four Hundred Billion Stars Series[edit]

The Confluence Series[edit]

The Quiet War series[edit]

The Choice series[edit]

Other novels[edit]

Novellas[edit]

Collections[edit]

  • King of the Hill. London: Gollancz, 1988. ISBN 0-575-05001-2
    • The King of the Hill
    • Karl and the Ogre
    • Transcendence
    • The Temporary King
    • Exiles
    • Little Ilya and Spider and Box
    • The Airs of Earth
    • The Heirs of Earth
  • The Invisible Country. London: Gollancz, 1996. ISBN 0-575-06072-7 — Philip K. Dick Award nominee, 1998[14]
    • "Gene Wars" (1991)
    • Prison Dreams
    • "Recording Angel" (1995)
    • Dr Luther’s Assistant
    • "The Temptation of Dr. Stein" (1996)
    • Children of the Revolution
    • The True History of Doctor Pretorius
    • Slaves
  • Little Machines. Harrogate: PS Publishing, 2005. ISBN 1-902880-94-3
    • The Two Dicks
    • Residuals
    • 17
    • All Tomorrow’s Parties
    • Interstitial
    • How we Lost the Moon
    • Under Mars
    • Danger: Hard Hack Area
    • The Madness of Crowds
    • The Secret of My Success
    • The Proxy
    • I Spy
    • The Rift
    • Alien TV
    • Before the Flood
    • A Very British History
    • Cross Roads Blues
  • A Very British History. Harrogate: PS Publishing, 2013. [15] [16]
    • Little Ilya and Spider and Box
    • The Temporary King
    • Cross Road Blues
    • Gene Wars
    • Prison Dreams
    • Children of the Revolution
    • Recording Angel
    • Second Skin
    • All Tomorrow’s Parties
    • 17
    • Sea Change, With Monsters
    • How We Lost the Moon, A True Story by Frank W. Allen
    • A Very British History
    • The Two Dicks
    • Meat
    • Rocket Boy
    • The Thought War
    • City of the Dead
    • Little Lost Robot
    • Shadow Life
    • The Choice

Short Stories[edit]

  • "Antarctica starts here". Asimov's Science Fiction 36 (10&11): 48–56. Oct–Nov 2012. 
  • "A Brief Guide To Other Histories"
  • "Edna Sharrow"
  • "Inheritance"
  • "Planet of Fear" (2015) in Old Venus (anthology)[17]
  • "Rocket Boy"

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "1988 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  2. ^ a b "1996 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  3. ^ a b "1997 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  4. ^ "1991 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  5. ^ "1992 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  6. ^ "Paul McAuley - Confluence The Trilogy cover art and synopsis reveal". Upcoming4.me. Retrieved 2013-10-24. 
  7. ^ "2009 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  8. ^ "Paul McAuley - Evening's Empires cover art and synopsis revealed". Upcoming4.me. Retrieved 2013-04-05. 
  9. ^ a b "Paul McAuley - Something Coming Through and Into Everywhere synopsis reveal". Upcoming4.me. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  10. ^ a b "1995 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  11. ^ "2001 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  12. ^ "2002 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  13. ^ a b "2005 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  14. ^ "1998 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-16. 
  15. ^ "Paul McAuley - A Very British History cover art unveiled". Upcoming4.me. Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  16. ^ "Paul McAuley announces A Very British History, table of contents unveiled". Upcoming4.me. Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  17. ^ "Not A Blog: Venus In March". GRRM.livejournal.com. June 19, 2014. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 

External links[edit]