Paul John Kvale

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Paul John Kvale
Paul John Kvale 1932.jpg
Personal details
Born (1896-03-27)March 27, 1896
Orfordville, Wisconsin
Died June 14, 1960(1960-06-14) (aged 64)
Minneapolis
Resting place Protestant Cemetery, Benson
Political party Farmer-Labor
Alma mater
Religion Lutheran
Military service
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1917-1919
Battles/wars World War I

Paul John Kvale (March 27, 1896 – June 14, 1960) was a U.S. Representative from Minnesota.

Early life[edit]

Kvale was born in Orfordville, Wisconsin as son of Ole J. Kvale. He attended the Orfordville school and the University of Illinois. In 1917, he moved to Benson, Minnesota with his parents. Kvale was graduated from Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, in 1917 and served in the United States Army during the First World War as a sergeant in a machine gun corps, from September 7, 1917, to August 4, 1919.

After the war, he became a student at the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis in 1919 and 1920, after which he returned to and engaged as editor of the Swift County News in 1920 and 1921. In 1921, he became staff editor of the Minneapolis Tribune.

Political career[edit]

From 1922 to 1929, Kvale served as secretary to his father, a member of congress. After his father's death, he was elected as a Farmer-Labor candidate to the 71st congress to fill the vacancy. Kvale was re-elected to the 72nd, 73rd, 74th, and 75th congresses, and served from October 16, 1929 to January 3, 1939. His run for reelection in 1938 to the 76th congress was unsuccessful.

On June 14, 1960, Paul John Kvale died in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was interred at the Protestant Cemetery in Benson. Asked how to say his name, Kvale told The Literary Digest: "Pronounced qually rhymes with golly."[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ What's the Name, Please?, Charles Earle Funk, Funk & Wagnalls, 1936

Other sources[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Ole J. Kvale
U.S. Representative from Minnesota's 7th congressional district
1929 – 1933
Succeeded by
General Ticket Adopted
Preceded by
General Ticket Adopted
U.S. Representative from Minnesota
General Ticket Seat Seven

1933 – 1935
Succeeded by
General Ticket Abolished
Preceded by
General Ticket Abolished
U.S. Representative from Minnesota's 7th congressional district
1935 – 1939
Succeeded by
Herman Carl Andersen