Paul K. Calaway

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Paul K. Calaway
Born (1910-03-31)March 31, 1910
Bethesda, Arkansas
Died October 31, 1993(1993-10-31) (aged 83)
Institutions Georgia Tech Research Institute
Alma mater

Arkansas College
Georgia Institute of Technology

University of Texas at Austin

Paul Kenneth Calaway (March 31, 1910 - October 31, 1993)[1] was an American chemical engineer and the director of the Georgia Tech Research Institute from 1954 to 1957.[2]

Education[edit]

Born in Bethesda, Arkansas,[3] Calaway received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Arkansas College, a Master of Science from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1933,[4] and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas.[5][6]

Career[edit]

After completing his doctorate, Calaway returned to Georgia Tech to teach chemistry, often teaching classes in explosives.[7][8][9] Calaway also spent time developing replacements for quinine, the anti-Malaria drug.[10][11]

As an associate professor of chemistry, he won Georgia Tech's first-ever Sigma Xi Research Prize for his paper "The Tolymercaptopropanones and their Condensation with Isatins" in 1947, which was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society in January 1947.[5][12] Calaway was inducted into Omicron Delta Kappa on May 25, 1952.[13]

From 1954 to 1957, Calaway was the director of the Georgia Tech Research Institute, then known as the Engineering Experiment Station.[2] In 1957, he returned to teaching.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Independence County, AR-Campground Cemetery". USGenWeb Archives. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  2. ^ a b "History Makers". Georgia Tech Research Institute. Retrieved 2010-01-27. 
  3. ^ "Audio Tape or Compact Disk Interviews". Old Independence Regional Museum. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  4. ^ Calaway, Paul (May 1933). "A study of the preparation of thiolbenzoic acid by new methods". Georgia Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  5. ^ a b "Dr. Paul K. Calaway Awarded '47 Sigma Xi Research Prize". The Technique. 1947-04-19. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  6. ^ "Fort Worth Star-Telegram Collection". University of Texas at Arlington Library. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  7. ^ "Dr. Calaway To Teach Again Powder Course". The Technique. 1941-11-21. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  8. ^ "Defense Course In Explosives Again Offered". The Technique. 1942-03-04. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  9. ^ "Dr. Calaway Speaks To Alpha Chi Sigma On Topic, 'Explosives'". The Technique. 1947-03-08. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  10. ^ "Graduate Chemist Develops Three New Quinoline Drugs". The Technique. 1942-02-20. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  11. ^ "A study of quinoline compounds". Georgia Institute of Technology. May 1942. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  12. ^ "Dr. Calaway Is Awarded Sigma Xi Research Prize". The Technique. 1947-06-28. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  13. ^ "Membership by Tapping Class". Georgia Tech Omicron Delta Kappa. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  14. ^ Martin, Harold H. (1987). Atlanta and environs: a chronicle of its people and events. Atlanta Historical Society. pp. 208–209. ISBN 978-0-8203-0913-2. Retrieved 2010-02-02.