Paul McCusker

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Paul McCusker
Born (1958-10-03) October 3, 1958 (age 55)
Uniontown, Pennsylvania,  United States
Occupation Writer, Producer and Director
Years active 1981 – present
Spouse(s) Elizabeth McCusker
Website
http://www.paulmccusker.com

Paul McCusker is a writer and producer best known for his work on Adventures in Odyssey, a nationally syndicated radio drama, and for his work with Focus on the Family's Radio Theatre. He has written over 50 books, 21 plays and 4 musicals. His best known works are the play "Catacombs", the novels The Mill House and Epiphany, and his audio adaptations of C.S. Lewis's works.

Career[edit]

McCusker grew up in Bowie, Maryland. He graduated from college with a degree in journalism and spent several years writing copy for a local publisher. From the late 1970s, he began writing sketches and plays for his church, Grace Baptist, many of which were published and are still in print. Among his most popular plays are "Catacombs"[1] and "First Church of Pete's Garage".[2]

In 1985, McCusker moved to California to write for Continental Singers and their touring drama group The Jeremiah People. In 1987, he was invited by Focus on the Family to help develop a radio show for kids, which later became Adventures in Odyssey.[3] He still consults on the show's scripts and writes them on occasion. He has also written 18 tie-in novels, including the "Passages" series. He won a Peabody Award for his work on Bonhoeffer: The Cost of Freedom.

In the late 1990s, Paul developed Focus on the Family's Radio Theatre.[4] He has also dramatized C.S. Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia, as well as A Christmas Carol, Les Misérables, Amazing Grace, the Father Gilbert Mysteries and The Screwtape Letters. Paul also writes novels, The Mill House and Epiphany being perhaps the best-known, and TSI: The Gabon Virus (2009) his most recent, which was co-written with Dr. Walt Larimore.

Personal life[edit]

Paul McCusker now lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado with his wife Elizabeth and two children; Tommy and Ellie. In 2007 he converted to Catholicism.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morford, Jessica (April 24, 2003). "'Catacombs:' script - unrealistic, presentation - decent". The Omnibus. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Dinner theater has teens trying to start church". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. March 3, 2007. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Producer feels real drama by winning 'Spinal Exam'". Gazette Telegraph. May 15, 1992. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  4. ^ Deutsch, Ken (December 12, 2008). "'Radio Theatre': Tales With a Message". Radio World. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  5. ^ National Catholic Register

External links[edit]

Screenwriter for Beyond The Mask