Paul Mero

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Paul Mero
Nationality American
Occupation Nonprofit executive

Paul T. Mero is the former president of the Sutherland Institute, a conservative public policy think tank based in Salt Lake City, Utah.[1] He is the author of several books.[2]

Background[edit]

Mero attended Brigham Young University from 1980 to 1984, graduating with a B.A. in Public Policy. While at BYU, Mero co-founded a conservative campus newspaper, The Western Scholar.

From 1987 to 1997, he was employed by the United States Congress, where he served two different Republican House members.[3] From 1987 to 1993, Mero served as press secretary and legislative assistant to Congressman William E. Dannemeyer. From 1993 to 1994, he worked for the Christian Action Network as its representative on Capitol Hill. From 1994 to 1997, Mero served as counselor and then Chief of Staff to Congressman Robert K. Dornan.

Throughout 1997, prior to joining the Howard Center for Family, Religion and Society, Mero founded and operated a non-profit organization, Projects for America, creating SWAN, a social issues database.[4]

From 1998 to 2000, Mero was the Executive Vice President of the Howard Center for Family, Religion and Society in Rockford, Illinois. In 1999, as part of his duties, he coordinated the meeting of the 2nd World Congress of Families in Geneva, Switzerland.[5]

From December 2000 to August 2014, Mero served as president of the Sutherland Institute, a conservative think tank based in Salt Lake City, Utah.[6]

Public activities[edit]

Mero is a frequent guest at the Fabrizio's KUED show[7] and, from 2008 to 2014, was host at the “Mero Moment” radio show, which aired every Tuesday at the KVNU (610 AM) radio station that serves Cache Valley residents.[8][9] In his speeches, Mero covers topics from family issues to immigration policy.

Mero partnered with Allan Carlson of the Howard Center to publish "The Natural Family: A Manifesto". The book makes an argument for the importance of heterosexual marriage and child-rearing.[10]

Publications[edit]

  • The Natural Family: A Manifesto [11]
  • The Natural Family: Bulwark of Liberty [12]
  • Mero, Paul T. (2007). Civil rights and sexual behavior: an analysis of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act Insight (Family Research Council of America). Family Research Council. p. 17. 
  • Removing Classrooms from the Battlefield: Liberty, Paternalism, and the Redemptive Promise of Educational Choice [13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Riley Roche, Lisa (2014-08-26). "Paul Mero steps down as head of Sutherland Institute". Deseret News. Retrieved 4 September 2014. 
  2. ^ "Board Members". The Sutherland Institute. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 
  3. ^ "Time Line Project". by B.L. Muirhead. Orange County L/G/B/T. June 2004. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 
  4. ^ Personal knowledge from Paul Mero
  5. ^ "Heritage Foundation Book Event for "The Natural Family: A Manifesto"" 1 (2). World Congress of Families. September 2007. p. 5. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 
  6. ^ Riley Roche, Lisa (2014-08-26). "Paul Mero steps down as head of Sutherland Institute". Deseret News. Retrieved 4 September 2014. 
  7. ^ "Fabrizio brings his thoughtful interviewing style to television". by Brandon Griggs. The Salt Lake Tribune. 4/08/2006. Retrieved 2011-07-01.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  8. ^ "Mero Moment: Examining the Ethics". The Sutherland Institute. January 28, 2010. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 
  9. ^ "Guest Bio". kcrw.com. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 
  10. ^ Book pushes family culture - The Washington Times, America's Newspaper
  11. ^ Carlson, Allan C.; Paul T. Mero (2007). The natural family: A Manifesto. Spence Publishing. p. 256. ISBN 978-1-890626-70-9. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 
  12. ^ Mero, Paul T.; Carlson, Allan C. (2007). The Natural Family: Bulwark of Liberty. Transaction Publishers. p. 256. ISBN 978-1-4128-0849-1. 
  13. ^ Mero, Paul T.; Witte, Daniel E. (April 2008). Civil rights and sexual behavior: an analysis of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act Insight (Family Research Council of America). Brigham Young University Law Review. p. 17. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 

External links[edit]