Paul Nathaniel Temple, Jr.

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Paul Nathaniel Temple, Jr. (born March 19, 1923[1]) is the Chairman Emeritus and co-founder of the Institute of Noetic Sciences and the Chairman of the Board of BioGenesis Enterprises.[2][3]

Biography[edit]

Paul graduated from Princeton University in 1944 and Harvard Law School in 1948.[2] From 1954 to 1961 he was an international petroleum concessions negotiator for Exxon.[2] He has been a member of the Institute of Noetic Sciences board of directors since 1973 and was the chairman from 1983 to 1999. He created the Temple Awards for Creative Altruism.[2][3] He helps fund The Fellowship Foundation.[4][5] Paul N. Temple was an insider "core member" of the Fellowship Foundation and/or Institute for Christian Leadership since the 1940s. Others classified with him in that category, per the Billy Graham Archives of Wheaton College included James Bell, Frank Carlson, Chuck Colson, Billy Graham, Wallace Haines, Mark Hatfield, Fred Heyn, Karlis Leyasmeyer and Albert Quie.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Linley, Vernona (2000). Adam Hurd of Stratford, Connecticut, 1649 and some of his descendants: James Reynolds of North Kingstown, Rhode Island, 1669, and some of his descendants. Linley. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Paul N. Temple". BioGenesis Enterprises. Retrieved 2009-07-03. 
  3. ^ a b "Paul N. Temple". Institute of Noetic Sciences. Retrieved 2009-07-03. [dead link]
  4. ^ Sharlet, Jeff (2008). The Family: Power, Politics and Fundamentalism's Shadow Elite. University of Queensland Press. ISBN 0-7022-3694-2. 
  5. ^ Getter, Lisa (September 27, 2002). "Showing Faith in Discretion". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2009-07-02. "The Fellowship does not solicit money. A handful of wealthy backers, including Detroit lawyer and GOP donor Michael Timmis, Denver oilman Jerome A. Lewis and former Maryland investor Paul N. Temple, support the Fellowship with personal contributions. Private foundations they control also contribute hundreds of thousands yearly to the International Foundation, tax records show."