Paul Nystrom

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Paul Henry Nystrom (January 25, 1878 - August 1969)[1] was a professor of marketing at Columbia University.

Paul Henry Nystrom retired from Columbia in 1950. Paul Nystrom is frequently associated with the philosophy of futility, a phrase which he coined in his 1928 book Economics of Fashion to describe the disposition caused by the monotony of the new industrial age.[2][3][4]

Nystrom served as editor of the American Marketing Journal and as the first editor of its successor, the Journal of Marketing. He was also a founding member of the American Marketing Association.[5]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Retail Selling and Store Management (1914, 1916, 1919)[6]
  • The Economics of Retailing (1915, 1930)
  • Textiles (1916)
  • Retail Store Management (1917, 1922)
  • Economics of Fashion (1928)
  • Economic Principles of Consumption (1929, 1931)
  • Fashion Merchandising (1932)
  • Retail Institutions and Trends (1932)
  • Trends Dangerous to Consumers Under the NRA (1935)
  • Retail Store Operation (1946)
  • Marketing Handbook (1951)
  • Automobile Selling (unknown)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Princeton University Library's Manuscripts Division. Paul Nystrom Manuscripts
  2. ^ Social Security Death Index (Social Security Administration)[dead link]
  3. ^ Economics of Fashion. Paul Nystrom, The Ronald Press Company p68. (1928).
  4. ^ The Journal of Marketing, Volume XXI, No.4 (April, 1957)
  5. ^ Agnew, Hugh (1937). "N.A.T.M. - A Survey". Journal of Marketing 1 (4): 305-309. 
  6. ^ "Scientific selling". The Independent. Nov 30, 1914. Retrieved July 24, 2012. 

External links[edit]