Paul Stagg

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Paul Stagg
Sport(s) Football, baseball, tennis
Biographical details
Born (1909-03-18)March 18, 1909
Chicago, Illinois
Died September 4, 1992(1992-09-04) (aged 83)
South Holland, Illinois
Playing career
Football
1929–1931

Chicago
Position(s) Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1932
1933
1934–1936
1937–1940
1941–1946
1947–1960

Baseball
1935–1936

Chicago (assistant)
Pacific (CA) (freshmen)
Moravian
Springfield (MA)
Worcester Tech
Pacific (OR)


Moravian
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1934–1937
1947–1961
1961–1967
Moravian
Pacific (OR)
Pacific (CA)
Head coaching record
Overall 94–99–12 (football)
12–8 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
3 NWC (1949, 1951–1952)

Paul Stagg (March 18, 1909 – September 4, 1992) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Moravian College (1934–1936), Springfield College (1937–1940), Worcester Polytechnic Institute (1941–1946), and Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon (1946–1960), compiling a career college football record of 94–99–12. Stagg played football as a quarterback at the University of Chicago, where his father, Amos Alonzo Stagg, was the head coach.[1] He was an assistant coach under his father at Chicago in the fall of 1932 before graduating in December with a Bachelor of Science, majoring in geography. He followed the elder Stagg in 1933 to the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, where he served as an assistant coach for a season before taking the head coaching job at Moravian. Paul Stagg returned to the University of the Pacific in 1961 as director of physical education and intercollegiate athletics, a capacity in which he served until 1967.[1][2][3]

Stagg's older brother, Amos, Jr., also played quarterback at Chicago under their father and was a later the head football coach at Susquehanna University. The two brothers coached against one another twice. In 1935, Amos Jr.'s Susquehanna Crusaders and Paul's Moravian Greyhounds played to a 0–0 tie in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.[4] The following year, Moravian beat Susquehanna, 26–16, in Selinsgrove.[5]

Marriage and graduate study[edit]

Stagg was married on August 13, 1934 to Virginia Russell in Chicago. He received a Master of Arts degree in physical education from Columbia University that June.[6] In the spring of 1947, he received a PhD in physical education from New York University.[1]

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Moravian Greyhounds () (1934–1936)
1934 Moravian 3–3–1
1935 Moravian 4–2–1
1936 Moravian 5–1
Moravian: 12–6–2
Springfield Pride () (1937–1940)
1937 Springfield 1–8
1938 Springfield 4–2–1
1939 Springfield 4–3–1
1940 Springfield 2–6
Springfield: 11–19–2
Worcester Tech Engineers () (1941–1946)
1941 Worcester Tech 0–6
1942 Worcester Tech 0–6
1943 Worcester Tech 4–2
1944 Worcester Tech 2–2–2
1945 Worcester Tech 0–5
1946 Worcester Tech 0–2
Worcester Tech: 6–23–2
Pacific Boxers (Northwest Conference) (1947–1960)
1947 Pacific 6–2 5–2 2nd
1948 Pacific 5–3–1 5–2 2nd
1949 Pacific 8–1–1 4–1–1 T–1st
1950 Pacific 7–2 3–2 T–2nd
1951 Pacific 8–2 4–1 T–1st
1952 Pacific 7–0–1 4–0–1 T–1st
1953 Pacific 2–4–2 0–4–1 6th
1954 Pacific 3–4 1–4 T–4th
1955 Pacific 4–4 2–3 T–3rd
1956 Pacific 3–6 1–4 6th
1957 Pacific 2–7 0–5 6th
1958 Pacific 1–7–1 0–4–1 6th
1959 Pacific 4–5 2–3 T–4th
1960 Pacific 5–4 2–3 4th
Pacific: 65–51–6 33–38–4
Total: 94–99–12
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Marsh, Tim; Schmidt, Ray (2003). "Another Stagg". College Football Historical Society Newsletter (LA 84 Foundation) 16 (4). Retrieved October 25, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Paul Stagg is Pacific Sports Boss". Lodi News-Sentinel. February 15, 1961. Retrieved October 25, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Stagg Resigns at Pacific's Athletic Boss". Lodi News-Sentinel. December 21, 1966. Retrieved October 25, 2010. 
  4. ^ Campbell, Jim (1994). "Like Father, Like Son". College Football Historical Society Newsletter (LA 84 Foundation) 8 (1). Retrieved October 25, 2010. 
  5. ^ AP (October 4, 1936). "Moravian's Late Drive Subdues Susquehanna". The New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Stagg–Russell". The New York Times. August 16, 1934. Retrieved October 26, 2010.