Paul Struye

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Paul Struye
Justice Minister
In office
March 1947 – 1948
Preceded by Albert Lilar
Succeeded by Henri Moreau de Melen
Presidents of the Senate
In office
27 June 1950 – 12 March 1954
Preceded by Robert Gillon
Succeeded by Robert Gillon
Presidents of the Senate
In office
24 June 1958 – 5 October 1973
Preceded by Robert Gillon
Succeeded by Pierre Harmel
Personal details
Born (1896-07-01)July 1, 1896
Ghent, Belgium
Died February 16, 1974(1974-02-16) (aged 77)
Ixelles, Belgium
Political party Christian Social Party PSC-CVP
Religion Roman Catholic

Paul Victor Antoine Struye (1 September 1896 – 16 February 1974) was a Belgian lawyer, politician and member of the Belgian resistance during World War II. He is particularly notable for having published the underground newspaper La Libre Belgique during the German occupation and for holding the position of President of the Senate between 1950 and 1954.

Early life[edit]

Struye was born in Ghent, Belgium in 1896, the son of Dr. Eugène Struye and Jenny Linon. He was educated at Sint-Barbaracollege. In 1914, with the outbreak of the First World War.

World War I[edit]

In 1915, Struye was smuggled out of occupied Belgium to join the Belgian army in exile, but was declared ineligible for all but ancillary military duties. Eventually he wrote to Queen Elizabeth to request a transfer to the front, where he served as a stretcher bearer. In 1918, while still at the front, he sat a philosophy degree. In November 1918, he was wounded in action.

Interwar[edit]

Between the wars, Struye joined the bar in Brussels. He also joined the newspaper La Libre Belgique where he wrote a weekly column.

World War II[edit]

During the Second World War, Struye was a leading member of the clandestine press. He was instrumental to resurrecting the La Libre Belgique. Struye's underground paper La Libre Belgique of Peter Pan achieved the biggest circulation of any underground paper in Belgium.

Political career[edit]

In the first post-war elections in February 1946, Struye was elected as senator for the region of Brussels in the Christian Social Party (PSC-CVP). In March 1947, he was made Minister of Justice. Struye took a pro-royalist stance during the Royal Question. Between 1950 and 1954, he served a first term as Presidents of the Senate. During the Second Schools' War, he championed liberal education. He was reelected as President of the Senate between 1958-1973.

He died in Ixelles on 16 February 1974.

Political offices
Preceded by
Robert Gillon
President of the Senate
1950–1954
Succeeded by
Robert Gillon
Preceded by
Robert Gillon
President of the Senate
1958–1973
Succeeded by
Pierre Harmel