Pauline Parmentier

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Pauline Parmentier
Pauline Parmentier WM13-012.JPG
Full name Pauline Parmentier
Country  France
Residence Paris, France
Born (1986-01-31) 31 January 1986 (age 28)
Cucq, France
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $1,474,615
Singles
Career record 313–279
Career titles 2 WTA, 8 ITF
Highest ranking 40 (21 July 2008)
Current ranking 94 (9 June 2014)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 2R (2008, 2012)
French Open 4R (2014)
Wimbledon 2R (2008, 2009, 2011)
US Open 3R (2012)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games 1R (2008)
Doubles
Career record 59–96
Career titles 0 WTA, 2 ITF
Highest ranking 89 (30 April 2012)
Current ranking 179 (26 May 2014)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (2013)
French Open 3R (2014)
Wimbledon 2R (2008, 2013)
US Open 1R (2008, 2011, 2012)
Other Doubles tournaments
Olympic Games 1R (2008)
Team competitions
Fed Cup 4–7
Last updated on: 26 May 2014.

Pauline Parmentier (born 31 January 1986 in Cucq) is a French tennis player. Her career-high ranking is world number 40, which she achieved on 21 July 2008, and her highest ranking in doubles is world number 89, which she reached on 30 April 2012.

Background[edit]

Parmentier was born to parents Dominique and Jean-Philippe. She has two brothers. Her favorite surface is clay. Parmentier first took to the courts aged 6.

Career[edit]

Parmentier has received wildcards into French Open tournaments in singles since 2005 and in doubles since 2004. Parmentier reached the second round of the 2007 US Open singles competition, as a qualifier, defeating Tatjana Malek before falling to Martina Hingis. In her career, she has won two titles on the WTA Tour. She has also won seven ITF singles titles, and two ITF doubles titles. She won three of the seven singles titles in 2007. Parmentier won her first WTA Tour title in October 2007, at the Tashkent Open in Uzbekistan.

Parmentier was the fourth seed in Bad Gastein in July 2008. She won the title, which was her second WTA title and her first Tier III. She defeated top seed Ágnes Szávay in the semifinals before defeating surprise qualifier Lucie Hradecká in the final.

Parmentier was nominated to play in the 2008 Olympic Games after Mary Pierce and Amélie Mauresmo withdrew.[1]

In 2010 she qualified for the 2010 Sony Ericsson Open by defeating American teenager Lauren Davis and Tamarine Tanasugarn.

In 2012, Parmentier reached the third round of the US Open.

At the 2013 Wimbledon Championships, she lost in the first round to Andrea Petkovic in straight sets.

In January 2014, she reached the semifinals of an $25,000 ITF event in Hong Kong after defeating top seed Magda Linette in the first round, followed by wins over Rika Fujiwara and Mayo Hibi. She followed this up with a career-best showing at a grand slam tournament; entering her home tournament, the French Open, as a wildcard with a ranking of 145 in the world, she reached the fourth round after defeating 17th seed Roberta Vinci, Yaroslava Shvedova and Mona Barthel.

WTA finals[edit]

Singles (2–0)[edit]

Winner – Legend (pre/post 2009)
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
Year-End Finals (0–0)
Tier I / Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Tier II / Premier (0–0)
Tier III, IV & V / International (2–0)
Titles by Surface
Hard (1–0)
Grass (0–0)
Clay (1–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 2 October 2007 Tashkent Open, Tashkent, Uzbekistan Hard Belarus Victoria Azarenka 7–5, 6–2
Winner 2. 14 July 2008 Gastein Ladies, Bad Gastein, Austria Clay Czech Republic Lucie Hradecká 6–4, 6–4

Doubles (0–1)[edit]

Winner – Legend (pre/post 2009)
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
Year-End Finals (0–0)
Tier I / Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Tier II / Premier (0–0)
Tier III, IV & V / International (0–1)
Titles by Surface
Hard (0–1)
Grass (0–0)
Clay (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1. 27 August 2011 Texas Tennis Open, Dallas, United States Hard France Alizé Cornet Italy Alberta Brianti
Romania Sorana Cîrstea
5–7, 3–6

ITF[edit]

Legend
$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments

Singles Finals: 19 (8-11)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 29 November 2004 Egypt Cairo, Egypt Clay Ukraine Yuliya Ustyuzhanina 6–1, 6–1
Runner-up 1. 06 December 2004 Egypt Cairo, Egypt Clay Russia Galina Fokina 6-4 6-3
Runner-up 2. 02 July 2006 France Perigueux, France Clay Ukraine Yevgenia Savranska 6-1 6-7 2-6
Winner 2. 16 January 2007 United States Fort Walton Beach, United States Hard Slovakia Jana Juričová 6–4, 6–3
Winner 3. 10 April 2007 France Biarritz, France Clay Tunisia Selima Sfar 6–2, 6–4
Winner 4. 10 April 2007 Luxembourg Pétange, Luxembourg Clay Germany Martina Müller 6–1, 6–4
Runner-up 3. 5 October 2009 United Kingdom Barnstaple, United Kingdom Hard (i) Sweden Johanna Larsson 2–6, 2–6
Winner 5. 19 October 2009 France Saint Raphaël, France Hard Czech Republic Sandra Záhlavová 7–6(7–4), 6–2
Runner-up 4. 04 July 2010 Italy Cuneo, Italy Clay Switzerland Romina Oprandi 0-6 2-6
Runner-up 5. 25 October 2010 France Poitiers, France Hard (i) Sweden Sofia Arvidsson 2–6, 6–7
Runner-up 6. 08 May 2011 France Cagnes-sur-Mer, France Clay Romania Sorana Cirstea 7-6 2-6 2-6
Winner 6. 6 June 2011 France Marseille, France Clay Romania Irina-Camelia Begu 6–3, 6–2
Winner 7. 4 July 2011 France Biarritz, France Clay Austria Patricia Mayr-Achleitner 1–6, 6–4, 6–4
Runner-up 7. 17 June 2012 France Marseille, France Clay Spain Lourdes Dominguez Lino 3-6 3-6
Runner-up 8. 16 September 2013 France Mont-de-Marsan, France Clay Brazil Teliana Pereira 1-6 4-6
Runner-up 9. 22 September 2013 France Saint Malo, France Clay Brazil Teliana Pereira 2-6 1-6
Winner 8. 09 February 2014 France Grenoble, France Hard (i) Ukraine Anastasiya Vasylyeva 2–6, 6–0, 6–4
Runner-up 10. 23 February 2014 United Kingdom Nottingham, United Kingdom Hard (i) Russia Ekaterina Bychkova 0-3 ret.
Runner-up 11. 31 March 2014 United Kingdom Edgbaston, United Kingdom Hard (i) Turkey Çağla Büyükakçay 4–6, 6–2, 2–6

Doubles Finals: 4 (2-2)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1. 14 July 2003 France Le Touquet, France Clay Luxembourg Mandy Minella Madagascar Natacha Randriantefy
France Aurélie Védy
2–6, 2–6
Winner 1. 16 November 2003 France Deauville, France Clay France Aurélie Védy Germany Maria Geznenge
Czech Republic Zuzana Hejdová
5–7, 6–2, 6–1
Winner 2. 23 November 2004 Egypt Cairo, Egypt Clay Czech Republic Petra Cetkovská Russia Galina Fokina
Russia Raissa Gourevitch
6–4, 6–2
Runner-up 2. 19 July 2009 France Contrexeville, France Clay France Stephanie Cohen-Aloro Austria Yvonne Meusburger
Germany Kathrin Wörle-Scheller
2-6 2-6

Single performance statistics[edit]

Tournament 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 W-L
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open LQ LQ LQ 2R A 1R 1R 1R 1R 1R 1–6
French Open 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R 4R 5–10
Wimbledon LQ LQ LQ 2R 2R 1R 2R 1R 1R 3–6
US Open 2R LQ 2R 2R A 2R 2R 3R Q2 7–6
Win–Loss 1–2 0–1 2–2 3–4 1–2 1–4 3–4 2–4 0–3 3–2 16–28
Year End Ranking 197 119 59 62 109 102 74 66

Doubles performance statistics[edit]

Tournament 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 W-L
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open 1R 1R 2R 1–3
French Open 1R 1R 1R 1R 2R 2R 1R 2R 1R 2R 4–10
Wimbledon 2R 1R 1R 1R 2R 2–5
US Open 1R 1R 1R 0–3
Win–Loss 0–1 0–1 0–1 0–1 2–4 1–2 0–1 1–3 0–4 3–3 7–21

References[edit]

  1. ^ "French stars to miss the Olympics". BBC Sport. 21 July 2008. Retrieved 22 July 2008. 

External links[edit]