Pavel Kolchin

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Pavel Kolchin
Pavel-Kolchin.jpg
Personal information
Born (1930-01-09)9 January 1930
Yaroslavl, Russia
Died 29 December 2010(2010-12-29) (aged 80)
Otepää, Estonia
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Professional information
Club Dynamo Moscow
Updated on 28 January 2012.
Pavel Kolchin
Medal record
Olympic Games
Men's Cross country skiing
Competitor for  Soviet Union
Gold 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo 4 x 10 km
Bronze 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo 15 km
Bronze 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo 30 km
Bronze 1964 Innsbruck 4 x 10 km
World Championships
Silver 1958 Lahti 15 km
Silver 1958 Lahti 30 km
Silver 1958 Lahti 4 x 10 km
Bronze 1962 Zakopane 4 x 10 km

Pavel Konstantinovich Kolchin (sometimes spelled Pavel Koltsjin; Russian: Павел Константинович Колчин; 9 January 1930 – 29 December 2010) was a Soviet cross-country skier who competed during the 1950s and 1960s, training at Dynamo in Moscow. He was born in Yaroslavl.

He competed in two Winter Olympics, earning a total of four medals. His bronze in the 15 km (9 mi) at the 1956 Winter Olympics was the first ever medal awarded to a non-Scandinavian (Finland, Norway, and Sweden) in cross-country skiing. Kolchin also won at the Holmenkollen ski festival, winning both the 15 km (9 mi) and 50 km (31 mi) events in 1958. His wife, Alevtina Kolchina, was also an Olympic champion in cross country skiing in 1964.

Kolchin also found success was at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships, where he won three silver medals in 1958 (15 km, 30 km, and 4 x 10 km) and a bronze medal in 1962 (4 x 10 km).

Kolchin was awarded Order of the Red Banner of Labour (twice - in 1957 and 1972) and Order of the Badge of Honor (1970). For his successes at the Winter Olympics, the Nordic skiing World Championships and the Holmenkollen, Kolchin received the Holmenkollen medal in 1963 (Shared with his Alevtina Kolchina (his wife), Astrid Sandvik, and Torbjørn Yggeseth). Kolchin and Kolchina are the first husband and wife team to ever win the Holmenkollen Medal. Kolchin died on 29 December 2010.

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