Peach Bowl

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Peach Bowl
Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl
Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl logo.png
Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl logo
Stadium Georgia Dome
Location Atlanta, Georgia
Previous stadiums Grant Field (1968–1970)
Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium (1971–1991)
Operated 1968–present
Conference tie-ins At-large/Group of Five (2014–present)
Previous conference tie-ins SEC, ACC
Payout US$3,967,500 (ACC) (As of 2011)[1]
US$2,932,500 (SEC) (As of 2011)[1]
Sponsors
Chick-fil-A (1997–present)
Former names
Peach Bowl (1968–1996)
Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl (1997–2005)
Chick-fil-A Bowl (2006–2013)
2013 matchup
Texas A&M vs. Duke (Texas A&M 52–48)

The Peach Bowl, officially known as the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl for sponsorship purposes, is an annual college football bowl game played in Atlanta, Georgia since December 1968. The first three Peach Bowls were played at Grant Field on the Georgia Tech campus in Atlanta. Between 1971 and 1991, Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium hosted the game. Since 1992, the Georgia Dome has played host. New Atlanta Stadium is planned to begin hosting the game in the 2017-18 season. Seven of the first ten meetings (all but the 1968, 1971, and 1974 games) pitted an Atlantic Coast Conference team against an at-large opponent. From 1993 until 2013, the game has matched a Southeastern Conference team against one from the ACC. In 2005, the bowl hosted its first-ever matchup of top 10 ranked teams.

The game was originally created as a fund-raiser by the Lions Clubs of Georgia in 1968, but after years of lackluster attendance and revenue, the game was taken over by the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce.

Chick-fil-A, a fast food restaurant chain based in nearby College Park, has sponsored the game since 1997, From 2006 until 2013, Chick-fil-A's contract gave it full naming rights and the game was referred to as the Chick-fil-A Bowl as a result. The traditional "Peach Bowl" name was reinstated following the announcement that the bowl would be one of the six College Football Playoff bowls.

The funds from the deal were used to increase payouts for the participating teams. In response, the ACC gave the committee the first pick of its teams after the BCS since 2006--usually the loser of the ACC Championship Game or one of the division runners-up. As of 2013, the bowl was sold out for 17 straight years, the second-longest streak behind only the Rose Bowl.[2] In 2007, the Chick-fil-A Bowl became the best-attended non-BCS bowl for the previous decade.

Starting with the 2014 season, the bowl will feature College Football Playoff matchups, with the 2016, 2019, 2022, and 2025 games hosting a national semifinal, with matchups in all years selected by the playoff selection committee.[3] In conjunction with its inclusion in the playoff system, the game returned to the Peach Bowl name on April 21, 2014 and the teams playing in the bowl will be selected by the CFP Selection Committee.[4][5][6]

The 2007 game was played on December 31, 2007 featuring the second Peach Bowl matchup between #15 Clemson and #21 Auburn. It was the first time the Peach Bowl had ended regulation play with a tie, and with the rules in play since the early 1990s, required an overtime, which Auburn won, 23–20.[7][8] With a 5.09 share (4.92 million households), the 2007 game was the highest-rated ESPN-broadcast bowl game of the 2007-2008 season as well as the highest rated in the game's history.[9] The rating was also higher than two New Year's Day bowls, the Cotton and the Gator.[10] In October 2009, the bowl extended the Atlantic Coast Conference contract through 2013. According to Sports Illustrated, although the bowl generated $12.3 million in profit in 2007, only $5.9 million of that was paid out to the participating schools.[11] On December 31, 2012 the bowl set new records for viewership. The New Year's Eve telecast – a 25-24 Clemson victory over LSU – averaged 8,557,000 viewers (a 5.6 household coverage rating), making it ESPN's most-viewed non-BCS bowl ever.[12][13]

Statistics[edit]

  • Holds record for largest attendance in the history of the Georgia Dome: 75,406 in 2006 (Georgia vs. Virginia Tech).
  • 17 straight sellouts (through 2013 Bowl).
  • Highest-attended non-BCS bowl game.[14]
  • $110 million in cumulative payout.

Results[edit]

All rankings are taken from the AP Poll.

Date Played Winning Team Losing Team Notes
December 30, 1968 LSU 31 #19 Florida State 27 notes
December 30, 1969 #19 West Virginia 14 South Carolina 3 notes
December 30, 1970 #8 Arizona State 48 North Carolina 26 notes
December 30, 1971 #17 Mississippi 41 Georgia Tech 18 notes
December 29, 1972 NC State 49 #18 West Virginia 13 notes
December 28, 1973 Georgia 17 #18 Maryland 16 notes
December 28, 1974 Texas Tech 6 Vanderbilt 6 notes
December 31, 1975 West Virginia 13 NC State 10 notes
December 31, 1976 Kentucky 21 #19 North Carolina 0 notes
December 31, 1977 NC State 24 Iowa State 14 notes
December 25, 1978 #17 Purdue 41 Georgia Tech 21 notes
December 31, 1979 #19 Baylor 24 #18 Clemson 18 notes
January 2, 1981 #20 Miami (FL) 20 Virginia Tech 10 notes
December 31, 1981 West Virginia 26 Florida 6 notes
December 31, 1982 Iowa 28 Tennessee 22 notes
December 30, 1983 Florida State 28 North Carolina 3 notes
December 31, 1984 Virginia 27 Purdue 24 notes
December 31, 1985 Army 31 Illinois 29 notes
December 31, 1986 Virginia Tech 25 #18 NC State 24 notes
January 2, 1988 #17 Tennessee 27 Indiana 22 notes
December 31, 1988 NC State 28 Iowa 23 notes
December 30, 1989 Syracuse 19 Georgia 18 notes
December 29, 1990 Auburn 27 Indiana 23 notes
January 1, 1992 #12 East Carolina 37 #21 NC State 34 notes
January 2, 1993 #19 North Carolina 21 #24 Mississippi State 17 notes
December 31, 1993 #24 Clemson 14 Kentucky 13 notes
January 1, 1995 #23 NC State 28 #16 Mississippi State 24 notes
December 30, 1995 #18 Virginia 34 Georgia 27 notes
December 28, 1996 #17 LSU 10 Clemson 7 notes
January 2, 1998 #13 Auburn 21 Clemson 17 notes
December 31, 1998 #19 Georgia 35 #13 Virginia 33 notes
December 30, 1999 #15 Mississippi State 17 Clemson 7 notes
December 29, 2000 LSU 28 #15 Georgia Tech 14 notes
December 31, 2001 North Carolina 16 Auburn 10 notes
December 31, 2002 #20 Maryland 30 Tennessee 3 notes
January 2, 2004 Clemson 27 #6 Tennessee 14 notes
December 31, 2004 #14 Miami (FL) 27 #20 Florida 10 notes
December 30, 2005 #10 LSU 40 #9 Miami (FL) 3 notes
December 30, 2006 Georgia 31 #14 Virginia Tech 24 notes
December 31, 2007 #22 Auburn 23 #15 Clemson 20 (OT) notes
December 31, 2008 LSU 38 #14 Georgia Tech 3 notes
December 31, 2009 #12 Virginia Tech 37 Tennessee 14 notes
December 31, 2010 #23 Florida State 26 #19 South Carolina 17 notes
December 31, 2011 Auburn 43 Virginia 24 notes
December 31, 2012 #14 Clemson 25 #9 LSU 24 notes
December 31, 2013 #20 Texas A&M 52 #22 Duke 48 notes

MVPs[edit]

Date played MVP(s) Team Position
December 30, 1968 Mike Hillman LSU QB
Buddy Millican LSU DE
December 30, 1969 Ed Williams West Virginia FB
Carl Crennel West Virginia MG
December 30, 1970 Monroe Eley Arizona State HB
Junior Ah You Arizona State DE
December 30, 1971 Norris Weese Mississippi QB
Crowell Armstrong Mississippi LB
December 29, 1972 Dave Buckey North Carolina State QB
George Bell North Carolina State DT
December 28, 1973 Louis Carter Maryland TB
Sylvester Boler Georgia LB
December 28, 1974 Larry Isaac Texas Tech TB
Dennis Harrison Vanderbilt DB
December 31, 1975 Dan Kendra West Virginia QB
Ray Marshall West Virginia LB
December 31, 1976 Rod Stewart Kentucky TB
Mike Martin Kentucky LB
December 31, 1977 Johnny Evans North Carolina State QB
Richard Carter North Carolina State DB
December 25, 1978 Mark Herrmann Purdue QB
Calvin Clark Purdue DT
December 31, 1979 Mike Brannan Baylor QB
Andrew Melontree Baylor DE
January 2, 1981 Jim Kelly Miami (Fla.) QB
Jim Burt Miami (Fla.) MG
December 31, 1981 Mickey Walczak West Virginia RB
Don Stemple West Virginia DB
December 31, 1982 Chuck Long Iowa QB
Clay Uhlenhake Iowa DT
December 28, 1983 Eric Thomas Florida State QB
Alphonso Carreker Florida State DT
December 31, 1984 Howard Petty Virginia TB
Ray Daly Virginia QB
December 31, 1985 Rob Healy Army QB
Peel Chronister Army S
December 31, 1986 Erik Kramer North Carolina State QB
Derrick Taylor North Carolina State CB
January 2, 1988 Reggie Cobb Tennessee TB
Van Waiters Indiana LB
December 31, 1988 Shane Montgomery North Carolina State QB
Michael Brooks North Carolina State CB
December 30, 1989 Michael Owens Syracuse RB
Terry Wooden Syracuse LB
Rodney Hampton Georgia RB
Morris Lewis Georgia LB
December 29, 1990 Stan White Auburn QB
Darrel Crawford Auburn LB
Vaughn Dunbar Indiana RB
Mike Dumas Indiana FS
January 1, 1992 Jeff Blake East Carolina QB
Robert Jones East Carolina LB
Terry Jordan North Carolina State QB
Billy Ray Haynes North Carolina State DB
January 2, 1993 Natrone Means North Carolina RB
Bracey Walker North Carolina DB
Greg Plump Mississippi State QB
Marc Woodard Mississippi State LB
December 31, 1993 Emory Smith Clemson RB
Brentson Buckner Clemson DE
Pookie Jones Kentucky QB
Zane Beehn Kentucky LB
January 1, 1995 Tremayne Stephens North Carolina State RB
Damien Covington North Carolina State ILB
Carl Reeves North Carolina State DT
December 30, 1995 Tiki Barber Virginia RB
Skeet Jones Virginia LB
Hines Ward Georgia QB
Whit Marshall Georgia LB
December 28, 1996 Herb Tyler LSU QB
Anthony McFarland LSU DL
Raymond Priester Clemson RB
Trevor Pryce Clemson LB
January 2, 1998 Dameyune Craig Auburn QB
Takeo Spikes Auburn LB
Raymond Priester Clemson RB
Anthony Simmons Clemson LB
December 31, 1998 Olandis Gary Georgia RB
Champ Bailey Georgia DB
Aaron Brooks Virginia QB
Wali Rainer Virginia LB
December 30, 1999 Wayne Madkin Mississippi State QB
Keith Adams Clemson LB
December 29, 2000 Rohan Davey LSU QB
Bradie James LSU LB
December 31, 2001 Ronald Curry North Carolina QB
Ryan Sims North Carolina DL
December 31, 2002 Scott McBrien Maryland QB
E.J. Henderson Maryland LB
January 2, 2004 Chad Jasmin Clemson RB
Leroy Hill Clemson LB
December 31, 2004 Roscoe Parrish Miami (Fla.) WR
Devin Hester Miami (Fla.) CB
December 30, 2005 Matt Flynn LSU QB
Jim Morris Miami (Fla.) DT
December 30, 2006 Matthew Stafford Georgia QB
Tony Taylor Georgia LB
December 31, 2007 C.J. Spiller Clemson RB
Pat Sims Auburn DT
December 31, 2008 Jordan Jefferson LSU QB
Perry Riley LSU LB
December 31, 2009 Ryan Williams Virginia Tech RB
Cody Grimm Virginia Tech LB
December 31, 2010 Chris Thompson Florida State RB
Greg Reid Florida State CB
December 31, 2011 Onterio McCalebb Auburn RB
Chris Davis Auburn CB
December 31, 2012 Tajh Boyd Clemson QB
Kevin Minter LSU LB
December 31, 2013 Johnny Manziel Texas A&M QB
Toney Hurd Jr. Texas A&M DB

Appearances[edit]

Rank Team Appearances Record
1 Clemson 8 3-5
2 NC State 7 4-3
3 Louisiana State 6 5-1
T4 Auburn 5 4-1
T4 Georgia 5 3-2
T4 North Carolina 5 2-3
T4 Tennessee 5 1-4
T8 West Virginia 4 3-1
T8 Virginia 4 2-2
T8 Virginia Tech 4 2-2
T8 Georgia Tech 4 0-4
T12 Florida State 3 2-1
T12 Miami (FL) 3 2-1
T12 Mississippi State 3 1-2
T15 Iowa 2 1-1
T15 Kentucky 2 1-1
T15 Maryland 2 1-1
T15 Purdue 2 1-1
T15 Indiana 2 0-2
T15 South Carolina 2 0-2
T15 Florida 2 0-2
T22 Ole Miss 1 1-0
T22 Arizona State 1 1-0
T22 Baylor 1 1-0
T22 Army 1 1-0
T22 Syracuse 1 1-0
T22 East Carolina 1 1-0
T22 Texas A&M 1 1-0
T22 Vanderbilt 1 0-0-1
T22 Texas Tech 1 0-0-1
T22 Duke 1 0-1
T22 Iowa State 1 0-1
T22 Illinois 1 0-1

Conference records[edit]

Records are based on a team's conference at the time of the game (e.g. South Carolina is 0-1 as an SEC member and 0-1 as an ACC member).

Conference Appearances Wins Losses Ties Winning Percentage
Atlantic Coast Conference 34 15 19 0 .441
Southeastern Conference 31 16 14 1 .532
Independents 14 9 5 0 .643
Big Ten Conference 7 2 5 0 .286
Southwest Conference 2 1 0 1 .750
Western Athletic Conference 1 1 0 0 1.000
Big Eight Conference 1 0 1 0 .000
Prior to 1996 merger of four Southwest Conference schools into the Big Eight.
Conference no longer sponsors football

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2011-2012 College Football Bowl Game Schedule". CollegeFootballPoll.com. Retrieved 2011-11-22. 
  2. ^ http://www.chick-fil-abowl.com/PressBox/BowlNews/BowlNewsViewer/tabid/122/ArticleId/106/Chick-fil-A-Bowl-Achieves-Earliest-Sellout-in-its-History.aspx
  3. ^ "Auburn-Clemson Match-up Gives Chick-fil-A Bowl 11th Straight Sellout". Auburn University. 2007-12-04. Retrieved 2007-12-11. 
  4. ^ Tim Tucker (April 18, 2014). "Chick-fil-A Bowl will restore ‘Peach’ to its name". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved April 20, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Chick-Fil-A Bowl adds 'Peach' back to name after playoff inclusion". CBSSports.com. 
  6. ^ "Bowl complies with new playoff". ESPN.com. 
  7. ^ "Auburn uses new spread offense, defeats Clemson for bowl win". ESPN. 2007-12-31. Retrieved 2008-01-01. 
  8. ^ Matthew Zemek (2008-01-01). "Burns shows how bright future is for Tigers". Fox Sports. Retrieved 2008-01-01. 
  9. ^ "Chick-fil-A Bowl a ratings success as game sets records". Atlanta Business Chronicle. 2008-01-08. Retrieved 2008-01-12. 
  10. ^ Thamel, Pete (2008-01-02). "Marquee Mismatches: Blame the System". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-01-12. 
  11. ^ Murphy, Austin, and Dan Wetzel, "Does It Matter?", Sports Illustrated, 15 November 2010, p. 45.
  12. ^ "Viewership Increases for ESPN Bowl Games". ESPN.com. Retrieved 13 January 2013. 
  13. ^ "NCAA Bowls: Clemson/LSU Hits Record-High on ESPN; Music City, Liberty Bowls Down". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved 13 January 2013. 
  14. ^ "Company not chicken about bowl spending". Sports Business Journal. 2007-12-03. 

External links[edit]