Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey

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Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Peapack-Gladstone
Map of Peapack-Gladstone in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Map of Peapack-Gladstone in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°42′56″N 74°39′24″W / 40.715443°N 74.65679°W / 40.715443; -74.65679Coordinates: 40°42′56″N 74°39′24″W / 40.715443°N 74.65679°W / 40.715443; -74.65679[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Somerset
Incorporated April 23, 1912
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor William H. Horton (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Marge Gould[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 5.853 sq mi (15.159 km2)
 • Land 5.808 sq mi (15.044 km2)
 • Water 0.045 sq mi (0.116 km2)  0.76%
Area rank 261st of 566 in state
11th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 243 ft (74 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 2,582
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 2,570
 • Rank 468th of 566 in state
18th of 21 in county[11]
 • Density 444.5/sq mi (171.6/km2)
 • Density rank 451st of 566 in state
19th of 21 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07934 - Gladstone[12]
07977 - Peapack[13][14]
Area code(s) 908[15][16]
FIPS code 3403557300[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885345[19][2]
Website pgborough.com

Peapack-Gladstone (also written as Peapack and Gladstone) is a borough in Somerset County in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 Census, the borough's population was 2,582,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 149 (+6.1%) from the 2,433 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 322 (+15.3%) from the 2,111 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] It is part of the New York metropolitan area, as well as the larger New YorkNewarkBridgeport, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area.

Peapack-Gladstone was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 28, 1912, from portions of Bedminster Township, subject to the results of a referendum held on April 23, 1912.[21][22]

Peapack is believed to have been derived from "Peapackton", a Lenape Native American term meaning "marriage of the waters", a reference to the confluence of the Peapack Brook and Raritan River in the area. Gladstone was named in honor of William Ewart Gladstone, who served as British Prime Minister several times between 1868 and 1894.[22]

The borough was a major shooting location of the CBS soap opera Guiding Light from 2007 until the show's conclusion in 2009.[23]

Geography[edit]

Peapack and Gladstone is located at 40°42′56″N 74°39′24″W / 40.715443°N 74.65679°W / 40.715443; -74.65679 (40.715443,-74.65679). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 5.853 square miles (15.159 km2), of which, 5.808 square miles (15.044 km2) of it is land and 0.045 square mile (0.116 km2) of it (0.76%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 1,226
1930 1,273 3.8%
1940 1,354 6.4%
1950 1,450 7.1%
1960 1,804 24.4%
1970 1,924 6.7%
1980 2,038 5.9%
1990 2,111 3.6%
2000 2,433 15.3%
2010 2,582 6.1%
Est. 2012 2,570 [10] −0.5%
Population sources:
1920[24] 1920-1930[25]
1930-1990[26] 2000[27][28] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,582 people, 887 households, and 675.9 families residing in the borough. The population density was 444.5 per square mile (171.6 /km2). There were 949 housing units at an average density of 163.4 per square mile (63.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 90.09% (2,326) White, 4.07% (105) Black or African American, 0.12% (3) Native American, 1.94% (50) Asian, 0.04% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.74% (45) from other races, and 2.01% (52) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.88% (281) of the population.[7]

There were 887 households, of which 37.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.5% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 19.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.13.[7]

In the borough, 26.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 33.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.0 years. For every 100 females there were 97.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.2 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $123,875 (with a margin of error of +/- $16,668) and the median family income was $145,333 (+/- $23,674). Males had a median income of $86,379 (+/- $16,014) versus $60,833 (+/- $16,980) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $61,841 (+/- $12,910). About 0.0% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.[29]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 2,433 people, 840 households, and 646 families residing in the borough. The population density was 419.5 people per square mile (162.0/km2). There were 871 housing units at an average density of 150.2 per square mile (58.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.45% white, 3.12% African American, 0.08% Native American, 1.23% Asian, 0.70% from other races, and 0.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.78% of the population.[27][28]

There were 840 households out of which 37.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.5% were married couples living together, 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.0% were non-families. 18.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.11.[27][28]

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.0% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.0 males.[27][28]

The median income for a household in the borough was $99,499, and the median income for a family was $118,770. Males had a median income of $62,446 versus $46,500 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $56,542. About 1.9% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

Municipal services[edit]

Emergency services[edit]

Policing is provided by the Peapack and Gladstone Police Department, which has a staff of nine officers and a Chief.[30]

Fire service has been provided since 1905 by the all-volunteer Peapack and Gladstone Volunteer Fire Company, known in the Somerset County Radio System as "51 Fire". The department operates out of the fire station located on Dewey Avenue. The department operates a 2010 Pierce Arrow Pumper known as 51-102 which acts as primary attack engine, a 1995 Marion Heavy Rescue known as 51-151, equipped with all kinds of rescue equipment for things such as confined space rescue and vehicle extrication, a 1999 Pierce Dash 2000, which acts as primary water supply truck as it is equipped with 3,000 feet (910 m) of 5-inch (130 mm) hose, and known as 51-103, and a 2001 Ford F-250 Brush Truck known as 51-141, which responds to all brush fires in and around the borough and is equipped with foam. The department retired a 1988 Pierce Lance in 2010 after many years of service.[31]

Emergency medical services are provided by the non-profit, all-volunteer Peapack Gladstone First Aid Squad, known as "51 Rescue", based at a newly renovated location on St. Lukes Avenue. The Squad operates 2007 and 2005 Ford MedTec ambulances. Retired in 2007 was a 1993 Ford MedTec ambulance. The Squad provides around-the-clock service at no cost to its patients.[32]

Emergency medical services are bolstered by Mobile Intensive Care Units (MICU) with paramedics from the local hospitals of Morristown Medical Center (also a regional trauma center) in Morristown and from Somerset Medical Center in Somerville. In the event of a serious trauma accident, as occurs occasionally on Route 206 which runs through the borough, the services of the New Jersey State Police North Shock Trauma Air Rescue (NorthSTAR), which is based in neighboring Bedminster Township, may be called upon to provide medical evacuation to a trauma center.

Public works[edit]

The Peapack Gladstone Department of Public Works (DPW) is responsible for maintenance for the borough's buildings, snow removal, sewer inspection, as well as the general maintenance of roads and other services.[33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Peapack-Gladstone is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5][34]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Peapack-Gladstone is William H. Horton (R, term ends December 31, 2014). Members of the Borough Council are Gerald J. Gunning (R, 2015), William "Bill" Muller (I, 2014), G.P. Caminitti (R, 2016), T. William Simpson (R, 2015), Anthony Suriano (R, 2014) and Mark Corigliano (R, 2016).[35][36][37][38]

Borough offices are located at the former school building, in the same facility as the local library, police department and municipal court.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Peapack-Gladstone is located in the 7th Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[8][40][41] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Peapack-Gladstone had been in the 16th state legislative district.[42]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[46][47]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[48][49] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[50] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[51]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[52] As of 2013, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Peter S. Palmer (R, Bernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[53] Freeholder Deputy Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015).[54] Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[55] Patricia L. Walsh (R, Green Brook Township, 2013),[56] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[57][58][59] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[60] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2013)[61][62] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[63]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,743 registered voters in Peapack & Gladstone, of which 283 (16.2% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 957 (54.9% vs. 25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 502 (28.8% vs. 48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[64] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 67.5% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 91.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[64][65]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 790 votes here (58.6% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 526 votes (39.0% vs. 52.1%) and other candidates with 21 votes (1.6% vs. 1.1%), among the 1,349 ballots cast by the borough's 1,681 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.2% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 860 votes here (65.4% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 430 votes (32.7% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 18 votes (1.4% vs. 0.9%), among the 1,314 ballots cast by the borough's 1,566 registered voters, for a turnout of 83.9% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[67]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 657 votes here (64.9% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 205 votes (20.3% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 140 votes (13.8% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 5 votes (0.5% vs. 0.7%), among the 1,012 ballots cast by the borough's 1,712 registered voters, yielding a 59.1% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[68]

Transportation[edit]

Gladstone NJT terminus

Gladstone is the terminus of the Gladstone Branch of the Morris and Essex Lines, New Jersey Transit, taking many of the borough's commuters to Hoboken and Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan daily. Peapack has its own station less than 2 miles before the terminus. It is close to Interstate 78 and Interstate 287 and U.S. Route 202 and U.S. Route 206.

Education[edit]

Students in public school for pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the schools of the Somerset Hills Regional School District, a regional school district serving students from Bernardsville, Far Hills and Peapack-Gladstone, along with those from Bedminster Township who attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[69] As of the 2010-11 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,858 students and 156.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.86:1.[70]

The three schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[71]) are Bedwell Elementary School[72] (PreK–4, 689 students), Bernardsville Middle School[73] (5–8, 577) and Bernards High School[74] (9–12, 795), all of which are located in Bernardsville.[75]

Gill St. Bernard's School is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational day school, serving students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.[76] The Cottage School and Cottage Elementary Schools serve students in preschool through the early elementary grades.[77]

History[edit]

Lime kiln

A lime kiln that was in operation until as late as 1950 is located at the center of Peapack. A detailed history of the town is described in the book A Journey Through Peapack and Gladstone from the local library, as well as in New Jersey Country Houses: The Somerset Hills (written by John K. Turpin and W. Barry Thomson), Mountain Colony Press, Inc. The Peapack-Gladstone Bank was established on September 21, 1921, originally named the Peapack-Gladstone Trust Company. It operates as the local bank for the greater region and is publicly traded under NASDAQ with the ticker symbol PGC.[78]

Sports[edit]

The town is home to Stronghold Soccer Club, which plays its matches at Mount St. John's on the grounds of Montgomery Academy.[79]

Horseback riding is very popular throughout the area. The United States Equestrian Team also has its home in Gladstone.[80]

Points of interest[edit]

  • Natirar - estate spanning 404 acres (163 ha) in Peapack-Gladstone, Far Hills and Bedminster that was sold by Hassan II of Morocco, to Somerset County and is now administered by the Somerset County Park Commission, including the 247 acres (100 ha) in Peapack-Gladstone.[81]
  • Hamilton Farm Golf Club, site of the Sybase Match Play Championship since its inception in 2010, which is the only match play format event on the LPGA Tour.[82]
  • The Gladstone train station building (in photo above) was re-labeled "Boston," and its surroundings were supplied with peat-moss dirt, period vehicles and extras in Victorian dress, for a 1962 movie shoot. In the Oscar-winning film "The Miracle Worker," Anne Bancroft in the role of Annie Sullivan boards a long-distance steam train there to take the job of Helen Keller's teacher.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Peapack-Gladstone include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
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  4. ^ Borough Clerk, Peapack & Gladstone. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 77.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Peapack and Gladstone, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Peapack and Gladstone borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Peapack and Gladstone borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
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  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Gladstone, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 9, 2011.
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  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Gladstone, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Peapack, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
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  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 29, 2012.
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  22. ^ a b Cheslow, Jerry."If You're Thinking of Living In/Peapack and Gladstone; Fox-Hunting and High-Priced Homes", The New York Times, August 7, 1994. Accessed August 29, 2013. "One local history speculates that the name Peapack came from the Leni Lenape Indian word 'peapackton' -- 'the marriage of the waters.' The Raritan River and the Peapack Brook meet at the eastern border of the borough. Gladstone is named for the British Prime Minister William Gladstone ... [B]y 1912, the Villages of Peapack and Gladstone found themselves in conflict with the rest of Bedminster Township. The villages wanted electric lights, telephones and fire hydrants and resented being forced to pay for rural roads in the township. The villages petitioned the State Legislature for the creation of the borough and the Legislature voted to do so on April 23, 1912."
  23. ^ Heyboer, Kelly. "Guiding Light: Rethinking soap operas in Peapack", The Star-Ledger, March 18, 2008. Accessed September 29, 2013. "The venerable CBS institution has adopted the New Jersey town of Peapack as its real-life set. About a fifth of the soap's scenes are now being filmed at locations in the Somerset County town."
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  71. ^ Data for the Somerset Hills School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 12, 2013.
  72. ^ Bedwell Elementary School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  73. ^ Bernardsville Middle School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  74. ^ Bernards High School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  75. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Somerset Hills Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  76. ^ History, Gill St. Bernard's School. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  77. ^ Contact Us, The Cottage School. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  78. ^ page, Peapack-Gladstone Bank. Accessed September 29, 2013.
  79. ^ About Us, Stronghold Soccer Club. Accessed September 29, 2013.
  80. ^ About the Foundation, United States Equestrian Team Foundation. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  81. ^ Natirar, Somerset County, New Jersey Park Commission. Accessed May 8, 2012. "Natirar is a 404-acre property located in the scenic hills of Somerset County within the municipalities of Peapack/Gladstone, Far Hills and Bedminster."
  82. ^ About, Sybase Match Play Championship. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  83. ^ Guide to the William R. Cox Papers, Washington State University. Accessed December 14, 2007.
  84. ^ Pearce, Jeremy. "ENVIRONMENT; Remains Of the Day, At a Price", The New York Times, October 27, 2002. Accessed February 13, 2013. "But ever since a full-blooded royal and erstwhile resident, King Hassan II of Morocco, died three years ago, locals have also speculated about the future of Natirar, the king's 500-acre estate and 28,000-square-foot Tudor house."
  85. ^ via Associated Press. "Jackie Says Photog Scraed Her", The Day (New London), November 28, 1968. Accessed June 27, 2010.
  86. ^ Bender, Marylin. "Blacks Snubbed in Business; Blacks Hit Job Changes: Business Johnson & Johnson Fills Position", The New York Times, April 19, 1970. Accessed June 27, 2010.

External links[edit]