Pedicularis densiflora

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Pedicularis densiflora
Pedicularis densiflora mt. diablo.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Orobanchaceae
Genus: Pedicularis
Species: P. densiflora
Binomial name
Pedicularis densiflora
Benth. ex Hook.[1]

Pedicularis densiflora, known commonly as Indian warrior, is a plant of the lousewort genus in the broomrape family.

Indian Warrior is native to California and Oregon in western North America and is found in chaparral, forests, California oak woodlands at low elevations.

Description[edit]

Pedicularis densiflora is a perennial herb with stout, green or sometimes reddish or magenta stems and fern-shaped leaves, and long spikes of deep red to bright pink flowers with toothed petals.

Like others of its genus, it is a root parasitic plant, attaching to the roots of other plants to obtain nutrients and water. This species is a facultative parasite, or hemiparasite, in that it can live without attaching to another plant but will parasitize if presented with the opportunity. It often parasitizes plants of the heath family, such as manzanita.

Traditional uses[edit]

Indian Warrior is used as a tea or tincture to promote healthy immune function and its ability to relax tense muscles.[citation needed] The buds and flowers are often added to tea blends for their color, flavor, and relaxing properties. It is also found to be useful in the treatment of insomnia, as well as having antioxidant properties.[citation needed]

Pedicularis densiflora flower

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Pedicularis densiflora information from NPGS/GRIN". www.ars-grin.gov. Retrieved 2008-03-14. 

External links[edit]