Pedro Solbes

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This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Solbes and the second or maternal family name is Mira.
Pedro Solbes Mira
Pedro Sorbes IMF.JPG
Second Deputy Prime Minister of Spain
In office
18 April 2004 – 7 April 2009
Prime Minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero
Preceded by Javier Arenas
Succeeded by Elena Salgado
Minister of Economy and Finance
In office
18 April 2004 – 7 April 2009
Prime Minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero
Preceded by Rodrigo Rato
Succeeded by Elena Salgado
In office
13 July 1993 – 5 May 1996
Prime Minister Felipe González
Preceded by Carlos Solchaga
Succeeded by Rodrigo Rato
European Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs
In office
16 September 1999 – 10 April 2004
Preceded by Leon Brittan
Succeeded by Joaquín Almunia
Personal details
Born (1942-08-31) 31 August 1942 (age 72)
Pinoso, Alicante, Spain
Political party Spanish Socialist Workers' Party
Spouse(s) Pilar Castro
Alma mater Complutense University of Madrid
Profession Economist

Pedro Solbes Mira (born 31 August 1942 in Pinoso, Alicante)[1] is a Spanish economist. He is the president of FRIDE, Madrid-based think tank.[2]

Career[edit]

While independent in the sense of not affiliated to any party, his various ministerial roles in Spain have always been within Socialist Workers' Party cabinets. He was agriculture and fisheries minister (1991–1993) and finance minister (1993–1996) in Felipe Gonzalez's cabinets, also MP representing Alicante for the same party until 1999.

Appointed by Spanish premier José María Aznar (of the main competing party, the People's Party) he was a European commissioner for economic and monetary affairs in the European Commission presided by Romano Prodi (the Prodi Commission).[3]

Then he served as second vice president and minister of economy and finance in the government of José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero which he held from 2004 to 2009.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Who's who in the Spanish Cabinet.". Spain View. Retrieved 11 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Fundación para las Relaciones Internacionales y el Diálogo Exterior - FRIDE". EuroMesco. Retrieved 17 September 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Spanish cabinet - key players". BBC. 22 April 2004. Retrieved 19 October 2013. 
  4. ^ "Whose head will roll?". The Economist (Madrid). 1 July 2004. Retrieved 15 January 2014. 

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Carlos Solchaga
Minister of Finance of Spain
1993–1996
Succeeded by
Rodrigo Rato
Preceded by
Leon Brittan
European Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs
1999–2004
Succeeded by
Joaquín Almunia
Preceded by
Rodrigo Rato
Minister of Economy and Finance of Spain
2004–2009
Succeeded by
Elena Salgado
Preceded by
Javier Arenas
Second Deputy Prime Minister of Spain
2004–2009
Succeeded by
Elena Salgado
Spanish Congress of Deputies
Preceded by
Title jointly held
Deputy for Alicante province
1996–1999
Succeeded by
Title jointly held
Preceded by
Title jointly held
Deputy for Madrid province
2008–2009
Succeeded by
Title jointly held