Pennsville Township, New Jersey

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Pennsville Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Pennsville
Pennsville Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Pennsville Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
map of Pennsville Township, New Jersey
map of Pennsville Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°37′34″N 75°30′11″W / 39.626°N 75.503°W / 39.626; -75.503Coordinates: 39°37′34″N 75°30′11″W / 39.626°N 75.503°W / 39.626; -75.503[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Salem
Formed July 10, 1721 as Lower Penns Neck Township
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Renamed November 2, 1965 as Pennsville Township
Named for William Penn
Government[7]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Richard Barnhart (term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4]
 • Administrator Jack Lynch[5]
 • Clerk Angela Foote[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 24.588 sq mi (63.683 km2)
 • Land 21.277 sq mi (55.108 km2)
 • Water 3.311 sq mi (8.575 km2)  13.47%
Area rank 110th of 566 in state
7th of 15 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 16 ft (5 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 13,409
 • Estimate (2013)[12] 13,117
 • Rank 186th of 566 in state
1st of 15 in county[13]
 • Density 630.2/sq mi (243.3/km2)
 • Density rank 422nd of 566 in state
5th of 15 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08070[14][15]
Area code(s) 856[16]
FIPS code 3403357870[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882134[19]
Website www.pennsville.org

Pennsville Township is a township in Salem County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 13,409,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 215 (+1.6%) from the 13,194 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 600 (-4.3%) from the 13,794 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] The township is named for William Penn.[21]

Lower Penns Neck Township was formed on July 10, 1721, when Penn's Neck Township was subdivided and Upper Penns Neck Township (now Carneys Point Township) was also formed. The township was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's original group of 104 townships. The township was renamed Pennsville Township based on the results of a referendum held on November 2, 1965.[22]

Pennsville CDP (with a 2010 Census population of 11,888[23]) is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community area located within Pennsville Township.[24][25][26]

Geography[edit]

Pennsville Township is located at 39°37′35″N 75°30′12″W / 39.626341°N 75.503451°W / 39.626341; -75.503451 (39.626341,-75.503451). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 24.588 square miles (63.683 km2), of which, 21.277 square miles (55.108 km2) of it was land and 3.311 square miles (8.575 km2) of it (13.47%) was water.[1][2]

The Salem River flows along the township's eastern and southern boundaries.[27]

The township borders Carneys Point Township, Mannington Township, Salem, and Elsinboro Township. Pennsville Township also borders a section of New Castle County, Delaware which is one of only two points of land east of the Delaware River that are within the state of Delaware.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,163
1820 1,158 −0.4%
1830 993 −14.2%
1840 1,219 22.8%
1850 1,429 17.2%
1860 1,506 5.4%
1870 1,472 −2.3%
1880 1,334 −9.4%
1890 1,280 −4.0%
1900 1,424 11.3%
1910 1,544 8.4%
1920 2,149 39.2%
1930 2,933 36.5%
1940 5,113 74.3%
1950 7,376 44.3%
1960 10,417 41.2%
1970 13,296 27.6%
1980 13,848 4.2%
1990 13,794 −0.4%
2000 13,194 −4.3%
2010 13,409 1.6%
Est. 2013 13,117 [12][28] −2.2%
Population sources: 1810-2000[29]
1810-1920[30] 1840[31] 1850-1870[32]
1850[33] 1870[34] 1880-1890[35]
1890-1910[36] 1910-1930[37]
1930-1990[38] 2000[39][40] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 13,409 people, 5,491 households, and 3,706 families residing in the township. The population density was 630.2 per square mile (243.3/km2). There were 5,914 housing units at an average density of 278.0 per square mile (107.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.68% (12,696) White, 1.54% (206) Black or African American, 0.23% (31) Native American, 1.42% (190) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 0.92% (124) from other races, and 1.19% (160) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.07% (411) of the population.[9]

There were 5,491 households, of which 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.6% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.5% were non-families. 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.97.[9]

In the township, 21.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 25.0% from 25 to 44, 29.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 95.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $58,153 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,425) and the median family income was $71,327 (+/- $6,934). Males had a median income of $53,166 (+/- $4,370) versus $42,054 (+/- $3,006) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,275 (+/- $1,740). About 7.0% of families and 9.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.4% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.[41]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 13,194 people, 5,317 households, and 3,711 families residing in the township. The population density was 571.1 people per square mile (220.5/km2). There were 5,623 housing units at an average density of 243.4 per square mile (94.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 96.68% White, 0.96% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.96% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.60% of the population.[39][40]

There were 5,317 households out of which 29.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.98.[39][40]

In the township the population was spread out with 23.2% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 25.4% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.1 males.[39][40]

The median income for a household in the township was $47,250, and the median income for a family was $57,340. Males had a median income of $45,523 versus $29,629 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,717. About 3.1% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.2% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.[39][40]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Pennsville Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year during the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2013, the members of the Pennsville Township committee are Mayor Richard Barnhart (R, term as mayor and on township committee ends December 31, 2013), Deputy Mayor Robert McDade (R, term as deputy mayor ends December 31, 2013; term on committee ends in 2014), Marc Chastain (R, 2014), Bill Masten (R, 2013; serving the unexpired term of Laura J. Cummings who resigned in September 2012) and Richie Raine (D, 2015).[4][42][43][44][45]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Pennsville Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[46] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[10][47][48]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[50][51] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[52][53]

The 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Celeste Riley (D, Bridgeton).[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

Salem County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders who are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Salem County's Freeholders (with party, residence, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Director Julie A. Acton (R, Pennsville Township, 2016; Administration), Deputy Director Dale A. Cross (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Public Safety), Bruce L. Bobbitt (D, Pilesgrove Township, 2014; Public Services), Ben Laury (R, Elmer, 2015; Public Works) Beth E. Timberman (D, Woodstown, 2015; Social Services), Robert J. Vanderslice (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Health and Human Services) Lee R. Ware (D, Elsinboro Township, 2016; Transportation, Agriculture and Cultural Affairs).[57][58] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Gilda T. Gill (2014),[59] Sheriff Charles M. Miller (2015)[60] and Surrogate Nicki A. Burke (2015).[61][62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 9,062 registered voters in Pennsville Township, of which 2,572 (28.4% vs. 30.6% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,797 (19.8% vs. 21.0%) were registered as Republicans and 4,686 (51.7% vs. 48.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties.[63] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 67.6% (vs. 64.6% in Salem County) were registered to vote, including 86.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 84.4% countywide).[63][64]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 3,204 votes here (48.7% vs. 46.6% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 3,129 votes (47.6% vs. 50.4%) and other candidates with 153 votes (2.3% vs. 1.6%), among the 6,576 ballots cast by the township's 9,291 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.8% (vs. 71.8% in Salem County).[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 3,547 votes here (54.3% vs. 52.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,859 votes (43.8% vs. 45.9%) and other candidates with 81 votes (1.2% vs. 1.0%), among the 6,528 ballots cast by the township's 9,041 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.2% (vs. 71.0% in the whole county).[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,959 votes here (46.9% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,688 votes (40.4% vs. 39.9%), Independent Chris Daggett with 424 votes (10.1% vs. 9.7%) and other candidates with 75 votes (1.8% vs. 2.0%), among the 4,181 ballots cast by the township's 9,259 registered voters, yielding a 45.2% turnout (vs. 47.3% in the county).[67]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the Pennsville School District. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[68]) are Valley Park Elementary School[69] with 330 students in grades preK-1, Central Park Elementary School[70] with 277 students in grades 2-3, Penn Beach Elementary School[71] with 316 students in grades 4-5, Pennsville Middle School[72] with 456 students in grades 6 - 8 and Pennsville Memorial High School[73] with 486 students in grades 9 - 12.[74][75]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 90.71 miles (145.98 km) of roadways, of which 73.02 miles (117.51 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.33 miles (11.80 km) by Salem County, 8.99 miles (14.47 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 1.37 miles (2.20 km) by the Delaware River and Bay Authority or the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[76]

Pennsville houses county, state, U.S., Interstates and toll expressways which all converge at the northern part of the township near the hamlet of Deepwater.[77] The southern terminus of U.S. Route 130 is in the township.[78] Route 49 begins at the converging point and travels south for about 8.2 miles (13.2 km) through the center of town.[79] Interstate 295 and U.S. Route 40 (multiplexed together) also pass through the north which houses Exit 1 along I-295 and which is also the Delaware Memorial Bridge that connects to the state of Delaware.[80] In addition, the New Jersey Turnpike begins where Routes 49, 40, 130 and 295 all intersect with one another, with the creation of a roadway from Pennsville to Woodbridge Township being the initial goal when the New Jersey Turnpike Authority was created in 1948.[81] Despite the Turnpike's southern end being in the township,[82] Exit 1 is officially located in neighboring Carneys Point Township.[83] The only major county road that travels through is County Road 551.[84]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers bus service to and from Philadelphia on the 402 route, and local service on the 423 and 468 routes.[85]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Pennsville Township include:

References[edit]

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  4. ^ a b Pennsville Township Committee, Township of Pennsville. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  5. ^ Township Administrator, Township of Pennsville. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  6. ^ Township Clerk's Office, Township of Pennsville. Accessed January 17, 2013.
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  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Pennsville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
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  24. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2013.
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  39. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Pennsville township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  40. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Pennsville township, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2013.
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  42. ^ Wehner, Brittany M. "Raine begins new term as Pennsville committeeman, Barnhart reappointed mayor", South Jersey Times, January 1, 2013. Accessed January 17, 2013. "Democrat Richie Raine, 64, is a lifelong resident of Pennsville and just recently completed his first term as committeeman. Winning the election victory in November, Raine was sworn-in to serve another three-year term."
  43. ^ Wehner, Brittany M. "Pennsville Township Committee appoints William L. Masten to vacant committee seat", South Jersey Times, September 22, 2012. Accessed January 17, 2013. "Within weeks of a former committee woman’s resignation, the township committee has appointed long-time township resident William L. Masten to the vacant seat.... Masten will take over duties of former committeewoman Laura Cummings, who resigned on Sept. 4."
  44. ^ Wehner, Brittany M. "Barnhart reappointed Pennsville Township mayor; Chastain, McDade begin new terms", Today's Sunbeam, January 2, 2012. Accessed January 17, 2013. "Republican Marc S. Chastain was sworn in for a three-year term on the committee on Sunday afternoon. Republican Robert McDade, who won re-election in November, was sworn in for a new term."
  45. ^ Wolfgang, Kelly. "Barnhart returns as Pennsville mayor; Cummings joins township committee", Today's Sunbeam, January 1, 2011. Accessed January 17, 2013. "Laura J. Cummings was also sworn in to her first term as a committeewoman. With the addition of Cummings, the political make-up of the committee is 4 to 1 in favor of the Republican Party.... The five-member committee is made up of Barnhart and Cummings along with Republicans Robert McDade and Steven Landis and Richie Raine, the lone Democrat in the group."
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  71. ^ Penn Beach Elementary School, Pennsville School District. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  72. ^ Pennsville Middle School, Pennsville School District. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  73. ^ Pennsville Memorial High School, Pennsville School District. Accessed October 31, 2013.
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  79. ^ Route 49 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 2009. Accessed October 31, 2013.
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  91. ^ Staff. "Comedian Ritch Shydner, a Pennsville native, returning home for New Year's Eve performance", Today's Sunbeam, December 19, 2010. Accessed May 12, 2011. "Though Shydner currently resides in Los Angeles, he was born and raised in Pennsville and says the town is still special to him."
  92. ^ Minnick, Kevin. "A story straight out of Hollywood: S.J. Sports Figure of the Year", Courier-Post, December 30, 2005. Accessed August 18, 2007. "Chicago White Sox catcher Chris Widger remains true to his Pennsville roots.... And now, after proving not only to himself but the Chicago White Sox organization that he could still play the game he loves, the Pennsville High School graduate can take a look at his professional resume and see World Series champion at the top."
  93. ^ Burke, Tim. "In the Widgers' household, it's like mother, like son", The Montreal Gazette, August 9, 1974. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Third-born son Mike Widger took the bait and through those fog-bound specs of his, there was a momentary glint... 'Sis' Widger (nee Sullivan) was up in Montreal on one of her two or three excursions from Pennsville, New Jersey, 35 miles on the other side of the Delaware River from Philadelphia, to see how the big lad was doing in his current role of Allouette linebacker."
  94. ^ Pawling, Chris. "Norm Willey passes with great reputation left behind", South Jersey Times, August 20, 2011. Accessed November 4, 2013. "Pennsville legend and former Philadelphia Eagles Pro-Bowler Norm Willey passed away earlier this week — just a few days before his 84th birthday — but leaves behind a reputation that will live on for many more years. Willey had the annual Thanksgiving Day trophy — the Norm Willey Boot, which is given to the winner of the Pennsville-Penns Grove football game — named after him."

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