People's Party (Belgium)

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People's Party
Founded 26 November 2009
Headquarters Avenue Molière 144
1050 Brussels
Ideology Liberal conservatism
Right-wing populism
Belgian Unionism
International affiliation None
European affiliation Alliance for Direct Democracy in Europe
European Parliament group No MEPs
Colours          Purple, Orange
Chamber of Representatives
1 / 150
Senate
0 / 60
Regional Parliament
1 / 75
European Parliament
0 / 22
Website
www.partipopulaire.be
Politics of Belgium
Political parties
Elections

The People's Party (French: Parti populaire, Dutch: Personenpartij), abbreviated to PP, is a conservative-liberal[1] political party in Belgium. Primarily a French-speaking party, it considers itself to be to the right of the Reformist Movement, the main centre-right party in Francophone Belgium.

The PP was founded on 26 November 2009 by Rudy Aernoudt and Mischaël Modrikamen, inspired in part by the examples of the People's Party in Spain and the Union for a Popular Movement in France.[2] The PP considers itself to be economically liberal in the European sense of the term. The party's manifesto emphasizes efficiency and disinterestedness in governance, plain speaking, and individual autonomy.[3] The PP aims to reform the justice system and to strengthen the Belgian federal government relative to the regions and communities.

In its first electoral test, the 2010 Belgian general election, the PP won 84,005 votes (1.29% of the national total) and returned Laurent Louis as its first Member of Parliament for Walloon Brabant. The PP list for the Senate, headed by Rudy Aernoudt, took 98,858 votes (1.53% nationally) but failed to return a Senator.

Aernoudt and Modrikamen had a public falling-out in August 2010. Laurent Louis had publicly supported the policy of Nicolas Sarkozy in deporting Roma people from France. These comments provoked the indignation of both Aernoudt and the leaders of the PP's youth wing,[4] but Modrikamen did not join in their call for Louis to apologize, and Aernoudt was expelled from the party. Aernoudt disputed the legality of his expulsion, and also criticized Modrikamen's call for a "Plan B" (an independent Wallonia-Brussels) as a betrayal of the party's federalist identity.[5] Aernoudt also publicly accused Modrikamen of financial misdeeds.[6] The rupture leaves the future of the party uncertain. The People's Party is supportive of Israel.

Mischael Modrikamen, president of the People's Party, has reiterated after the regional elections in 2012 the interest to offer a partnership with the Flemish party, the New Flemish Alliance (N-VA), to transform Belgium into a confederal state in 2014.[citation needed]

In 2014 the PP won 1 seat in the chamber of representatives and 1 seat in the Walloon Parliament. The PP reached more than 10% in some cantons. However Mischaël Modrikamen did not get a seat in the chamber of representatives. The PP participated in the European elections for the first time but did not get a seat despite the score of Luc Trullemans.

Electoral results[edit]

Federal Parliament[edit]

Chamber of Representatives[edit]

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of language
group vote
# of overall seats won # of language
group seats won
+/- Notes
2010 84,005 1.3
1 / 150
1 / 62
new in opposition
2014 102,599 1.51 (#13)
1 / 150
1 / 62
Steady 0 in opposition

Senate[edit]

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of language
group vote
# of overall seats won # of language
group seats won
+/- Notes
2010 98,858 1.5
0 / 40
0 / 15
2014 N/A N/A N/A (#13)
0 / 60
0 / 15
Steady 0

Regional parliaments[edit]

Walloon Parliament[edit]

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of language
group vote
# of overall seats won +/- Notes
2014 98,840 4,89 (#6)
1 / 75
new in opposition

Brussels Parliament[edit]

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of language
group vote
# of overall seats won +/- Notes
2014 7.942 1,94 (#8)
0 / 89
new

European Parliament[edit]

Election year # of overall votes  % of overall vote  % of language
group vote
# of overall seats won +/- Notes
2014 145,538 2,18 5,98 (#5)
0 / 21
new

Notable figures[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]