Pepper Pike, Ohio

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Pepper Pike, Ohio
City
Pepper Pike
Pepper Pike
Motto: "A Great Place to Live and Work"
Location of Pepper Pike in Ohio
Location of Pepper Pike in Ohio
Location of Pepper Pike in Cuyahoga County
Location of Pepper Pike in Cuyahoga County
Coordinates: 41°28′37″N 81°28′8″W / 41.47694°N 81.46889°W / 41.47694; -81.46889Coordinates: 41°28′37″N 81°28′8″W / 41.47694°N 81.46889°W / 41.47694; -81.46889
Country United States
State Ohio
County Cuyahoga
Government
 • Mayor Richard Bain
Area[1]
 • Total 7.09 sq mi (18.36 km2)
 • Land 7.06 sq mi (18.29 km2)
 • Water 0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation[2] 1,060 ft (323 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 5,979
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 6,040
 • Density 846.9/sq mi (327.0/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 44122, 44124
Area code(s) 216
FIPS code 39-61686[5]
GNIS feature ID 1044373[2]
Website http://www.pepperpike.org/

Pepper Pike is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. It is an affluent suburb of Cleveland. The population was 5,979 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

In 1763, sixteen pioneers settled the area along the eastern border of present-day Cuyahoga County. In 1763, Orange Township was established, which included the present municipalities of Pepper Pike, Hunting Valley, Moreland Hills, Orange Village and Woodmere. Orange Township was the birthplace of President James A. Garfield in 1831. By the late 1880s, dairy farming and cheese production became the primary industry of the township. In 1924, residents of the northwestern quadrant of Orange Township voted to separate, and the village of Pepper Pike was incorporated. The name "Pepper Pike" was selected after the Pepper family, who lived and worked along the primary transportation corridor (i.e., turnpike). Incorporated as a city in 1970, Pepper Pike operates under the mayor-council form of government. The population was 5,123 in 1970, increasing to 6,177 in 1980, with the current population remaining below 6,200. On June 22, 2002, Mayors Bruce Akers of Pepper Pike, Kathy Mulcahy of Orange Village, Charles Smith of Woodmere Village, Susan Renda of Moreland Hills and Cuyahoga County Executive Ed Fitzgerald held a press conference to announce a study that will be conducted to assess the advisability of merging the four communities.

Geography[edit]

Pepper Pike is located at 41°28′37″N 81°28′8″W / 41.47694°N 81.46889°W / 41.47694; -81.46889 (41.476836, -81.468975).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.09 square miles (18.36 km2), of which, 7.06 square miles (18.29 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 219
1940 423 93.2%
1950 874 106.6%
1960 3,217 268.1%
1970 5,382 67.3%
1980 6,177 14.8%
1990 6,185 0.1%
2000 6,040 −2.3%
2010 5,979 −1.0%
Est. 2012 6,040 1.0%
Sources:[7][8] [9][10][11][12][5][13]

The median income for a household in the city was $149,631, and the median income for a family was $166,765. The per capita income for the city was $68,984. About 3.1% of the total population were below the poverty line. Of the city's population over the age of 25, 69.7% held a bachelor's degree or higher.[14][15]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 5,979 people, 2,176 households, and 1,753 families residing in the city. The population density was 846.9 inhabitants per square mile (327.0 /km2). There were 2,349 housing units at an average density of 332.7 per square mile (128.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 86.3% White, 6.5% African American, 0.2% Native American, 5.5% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 2,176 households of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.5% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 19.4% were non-families. 16.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 2.91.

The median age in the city was 49.2 years. 23.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 14.1% were from 25 to 44; 32.5% were from 45 to 64; and 23.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.5% male and 53.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

In 2000, there were 1,000 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.3% were married couples living together, 5.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.7% were non-families. 14.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.6% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 16.7% from 25 to 44, 34.5% from 45 to 64, and 20.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females there were 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.5 males.

Education[edit]

Pepper Pike is served by the Orange City School System which is well known as an exceptional public school system. For many decades, it has ranked among the best public school systems in the State of Ohio and throughout the U.S.[citation needed]

Ursuline College is located in Pepper Pike.

Cemeteries[edit]

  • Orange Cemetery, Lander Circle & Chagrin Blvd.

Notable residents[edit]

Surrounding communities[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  8. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  9. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Pepper Pike (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau". Quickfacts.census.gov. Retrieved 2012-12-22. 
  15. ^ http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_10_5YR_DP03&prodType=table

External links[edit]