Burr mill

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Burr grinder for poppy seeds, burr visible on front
Traditional manual coffee grinder
A pepper mill.
A salt mill.
Grinding gear from a disposable salt mill, computed tomography image
Flight through a 3D reconstruction of a disposable pepper grinder, from CT-data

A burr mill or burr grinder is a device to grind hard, small food products between two revolving abrasive surfaces separated by a distance usually set by the user. When the distance is larger, the resulting ground material is coarser. When the two surfaces are set closer together, the resulting ground material is finer and smaller. Usually the device includes a revolving screw that pushes the food through. It may be powered electrically or manually.

Devices with rapidly rotating blades which chop repeatedly (see food processor) are often described as grinders, but are not burr grinders. Burr mills do not heat the ground product by friction as much as blade grinders, and produce particles of a uniform size determined by the separation between the grinding surfaces.

Food burr mills are usually manufactured for a single purpose: coffee beans, dried peppercorns, coarse salt, spices, or poppy seeds, for example. Coffee mills are usually powered by electric motors; domestic pepper, salt, and spice mills, used to sprinkle a little seasoning on food, are usually operated manually, sometimes by a battery-powered motor.

Coffee grinders[edit]

The uniform particle size achieved using a burr grinder is typically desirable for coffee preparation. However, some methods of brewing may be more tolerant of the range of particle sizes produced by a blade grinder; this may be the case for drip (percolated) coffee. Regardless, burr coffee grinders are more suited for keeping the flavor and aroma of the coffee beans intact. This is because burr mills produce less heat from friction compared to blade grinders—this is especially important for coffee aficionados looking to get the most flavor from the freshly ground beans. Heat from friction lessens or taints the natural flavor. Burr grinders create less friction and require fewer motor RPMs which reduces potential flavor loss due to heat.[citation needed]

Burr grinders obtain these lower speeds through two mechanisms. The lower cost models general use a small electric motor to drive a series of reduction gears while better constructed and more costly examples use a larger commercial motor and a belt with no gear reduction to spin the burrs. The latter example is termed "direct drive." The reduction gear versions are more noisy and usually do not have the lifespan of the direct drive units.

Electrical powered burr grinders are available in many variations. Some grinders are "stepped" meaning that they fixed by the factory into a set series of adjustments while "stepless" varieties use a worm drive or other mechanisms to offer an infinite number of adjustments within their grind range. Other variations include grinders that are equipped with dosers and others that are "doserless." Dosers function as a catch bin to collect the ground coffee and by using a lever, users are able to dose a set amount of coffee. Doserless versions remove the bin and dosing function and the grinder outputs the ground coffee directly into an espresso machine portafilter or into another container. The doserless examples normally feature additional functions such as weight based or advance time based grinding in order for a barista to grind for an exact amount of grounds required for a specific espresso shot.

Manual coffee grinders have been largely supplanted by electrically powered ones where the object is simply to get the job done; manual grinders are used more for their "traditional" appearance: they are made to look good, and are often more costly than the cheaper electric models. An exception is the manual Turkish coffee grinder; these are inexpensive, and can grind coffee to fine powder for Turkish coffee, unlike the cheaper electric models.

Many grinders are free-standing; some larger coffee grinders are fixed to a wall.

Manual grinders[edit]

Manual burr grinders are turned by hand, rotating one grinding surface against the other. Coffee mills usually have a handle, providing leverage for the many turns required to grind enough coffee for a cup. The ground coffee is collected in a container which is part of the mill.

Salt, pepper, and spice mills, essentially the same as coffee mills, usually do not have a handle, the entire top rotating instead. While this is less convenient, only a few turns are required to grind enough. The ground product falls directly onto the food being seasoned; the mill has no container. A few mills have abrasive surfaces which do not rotate; each squeeze of the handles moves one flat plate past another, then the plates are restored to their original position by a spring. Many hard spices are available in containers incorporating a simple cone burr grinder, intended to be discarded when empty.

Most grinders can be adjusted to set the fineness of grind.

Manual mills can be used for grinding other food products than they are intended for. Be aware that mills designed for pepper grinding are inappropriate for grinding flour. However, coffee mills are a suitable substitute. Laura Ingalls Wilder's novel The Long Winter describes a family grinding wheat in a coffee mill to make flour during months of hardship.

Peugeot of France created the pepper grinder in 1842.[citation needed] The mechanism of case hardened steel cracked the peppercorns before the actual grinding process. The grooves on the Peugeot mechanism were individually cut into the metal and then case hardened, making them virtually indestructible.

Types of materials[edit]

There are several types of materials used in pepper mills. Each has its own particular advantages.

Stainless Steel: One of the most suitable and durable materials for grinding peppercorns and coffee beans. The male and female sections of the grinding mechanism are usually made from powdered, pressed metal. This material is preferred by professional chefs. The teeth of the grinder are machined to cut spice or beans. Stainless steel is not suggested for grinding salt.

Zinc alloy: Perhaps the most common mechanism found in pepper grinders, zinc alloy is composed of a mixture of metals, primarily zinc, with chrome plating to resist corrosion. It is a good choice for grinding pepper, but is not suitable for grinding salt.

Carbon steel: An extremely hard metal, carbon steel provides the sharpest edges and most efficient grinding capability, and is preferred by professional chefs. Carbon steel is not suitable for grinding salt.

Ceramic: Ceramic is extremely hard and provides the best performance for multi-use grinding. It does not corrode and is suitable for grinding coffee beans, pepper, salt and spices.

Acrylic: Durable and low cost, acrylic is a non-corrosive material suitable for grinding salt and spices.

Electric grinders[edit]

Electric burr grinders are powered by electricity from a battery or mains supply. An electric motor drives the grinding elements against each other. Electric grinders grind faster than manual grinders with no effort, but heat the ground product a little by friction.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

A detailed guide to coffee grinders