Pequannock Township, New Jersey

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Pequannock Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Pequannock
Pequannock Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Pequannock Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pequannock Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pequannock Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°57′46″N 74°18′19″W / 40.96267°N 74.305205°W / 40.96267; -74.305205Coordinates: 40°57′46″N 74°18′19″W / 40.96267°N 74.305205°W / 40.96267; -74.305205[1][2]
Country United States
U.S. state New Jersey
County Morris
Formed March 25, 1740 as Poquanock Township
Incorporated February 21, 1798 as Pequanack Township
Government[7]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Richard Phelan (term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4]
 • Manager David Hollberg[5]
 • Clerk Jay Delaney[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 7.171 sq mi (18.575 km2)
 • Land 6.748 sq mi (17.478 km2)
 • Water 0.423 sq mi (1.096 km2)  5.90%
Area rank 241st of 566 in state
21st of 39 in county[2]
Elevation [8] 203 ft (62 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 15,540
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 15,565
 • Rank 163rd of 566 in state
14th of 39 in county[13]
 • Density 2,302.7/sq mi (889.1/km2)
 • Density rank 267th of 566 in state
12th of 39 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07440 – Pequannock[14]
07444 – Pompton Plains[15]
Area code(s) 862 & 973
FIPS code 3402758110[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882208[18][2]
Website http://www.peqtwp.org/

Pequannock Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 15,540,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 1,652 (+11.9%) from the 13,888 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,044 (+8.1%) from the 12,844 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Pequannock Township includes neighborhoods known as Pequannock and Pompton Plains, each of which is served by a separate branch of the United States Postal Service.[20]

The name "Pequannock", as used in the name of the Township and of the Pequannock River, is thought to have been derived from the Lenni Lenape Native American word "Paquettahhnuake", meaning, "cleared land ready or being readied for cultivation".[21] Pompton has been cited by some sources to mean "a place where they catch soft fish".[22]

New Jersey Monthly ranked Pequannock Township as the "Best Bang for the Buck" in New Jersey and 9th overall in its 2011 edition of "Best Places to Live" in New Jersey.[23] It was then ranked 14th overall in the 2013 edition of "Best Places to Live".[24]

Geography[edit]

Pequannock Township is located at 40°57′46″N 74°18′19″W / 40.96267°N 74.305205°W / 40.96267; -74.305205 (40.96267,-74.305205). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 7.171 square miles (18.575 km2), of which, 6.748 square miles (17.478 km2) of it is land and 0.423 square miles (1.096 km2) of it (5.90%) is water.[1][2]

The Township of Pequannock is located in eastern Morris County, along Route 23, approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) north of the interchange of Route 23 with Interstate 80 and U.S. Route 46. Interstate 287 crosses the northwest corner of the township, with a full interchange just north of the township in the borough of Riverdale. Pequannock Township is located 20 miles (32 km) west of New York City.[25]

History[edit]

The name for the area goes back at least as far as March 1, 1720, when it was referred to as "Poquanick", a precinct in Hunterdon County. Formed as "Poquanock Township" on March 25, 1740 as one of the largest townships in the region, this 7.171-square-mile (18.57 km2) bedroom community composed of Pompton Plains in its northern portion and old Pequannock in its southern was once a vast 176-square-mile (460 km2) region of rural farmland settled by the Dutch after its purchase by Arent Schuyler and associates in 1695 and 1696. The township was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships on February 21, 1798.[26]

Over time, several municipalities were split off from the township: Jefferson Township on February 11, 1804; Rockaway Township on April 8, 1844; Boonton Township on April 11, 1867; Montville Township on April 11, 1867; Butler Borough on March 13, 1901; Kinnelon Borough on March 21, 1922; Lincoln Park Borough on April 25, 1922; and Riverdale Borough on April 17, 1923.[26]

During the American Revolutionary War, both Comte de Rochambeau and George Washington's troops camped on what is now the site of the Pequannock Valley Middle School. While Washington stayed at the Schuyler-Colfax House in nearby Pompton, unproven oral history states that he attended church services in the First Reformed Church located in Pompton Plains, also known as the Pompton Meeting House, which had been constructed in 1771. The Mandeville Inn, located on the site of where the soldiers had camped during the war, was built in 1788 and was once owned by Garret Hobart, later Vice President of the United States. The stone with the engraved date is now located inside the Pequannock Valley Middle School when the Inn was demolished and replaced with the school in 1950.[27]

During the Civil War, Pequannock was a stop on the Underground Railroad. The Giles Mandeville House (also built in 1788), a field and quarry-stone structure located at 515 Newark-Pompton Turnpike, which is believed to have served as a waypoint for many runaway slaves, still stands today in use as the Manse of the adjacent First Reformed Church since 1953.[28]

Historic sites[edit]

Historic sites located in Pequannock Township include:[29]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 3,853 *
1820 3,820 −0.9%
1830 4,355 14.0%
1840 5,190 19.2%
1850 4,126 * −20.5%
1860 5,438 31.8%
1870 1,534 * −71.8%
1880 2,239 46.0%
1890 2,862 27.8%
1900 3,250 13.6%
1910 1,921 * −40.9%
1920 2,291 19.3%
1930 2,104 * −8.2%
1940 2,856 35.7%
1950 5,254 84.0%
1960 10,553 100.9%
1970 14,350 36.0%
1980 13,776 −4.0%
1990 12,844 −6.8%
2000 13,888 8.1%
2010 15,540 11.9%
Est. 2012 15,565 [12] 0.2%
Population sources:
1800-1920[30] 1840[31]
1850-1870[32] 1850[33]
1870[34] 1880-1890[35]
1890-1910[36] 1910-1930[37]
1930-1990[38] 2000[39][40] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 15,540 people, 6,471 households, and 3,986 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,302.7 per square mile (889.1 /km2). There were 6,794 housing units at an average density of 1,006.7 per square mile (388.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.76% (14,881) White, 0.48% (75) Black or African American, 0.09% (14) Native American, 1.94% (302) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.89% (138) from other races, and 0.84% (130) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.52% (703) of the population.[9]

There were 6,471 households, of which 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.9% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.4% were non-families. 35.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 25.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 3.18.[9]

In the township, 21.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 19.4% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 24.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.2 years. For every 100 females there were 85.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.3 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $84,322 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,784) and the median family income was $109,572 (+/- $9,602). Males had a median income of $77,988 (+/- $7,857) versus $50,744 (+/- $7,369) for females. The per capita income for the township was $42,016 (+/- $2,741). About 1.8% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.7% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[41]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 13,888 people, 5,026 households, and 3,829 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,965.1 people per square mile (758.4/km²). There were 5,097 housing units at an average density of 721.2 per square mile (278.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.60% White, 0.30% African American, 0.12% Native American, 1.91% Asian, 0.50% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.94% of the population.[39][40]

There were 5,026 households, out of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.5% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 20.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.23.[39][40]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.9% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.5 males.[39][40]

The median income for a household in the township was $72,729, and the median income for a family was $84,487. Males had a median income of $61,093 versus $38,523 for females. The per capita income for the township was $31,892. About 2.5% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.4% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.[39][40]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Since 1957, the Township has operated under the Council-Manager Plan E form of government under the Faulkner Act. The Council consists of five members elected at large to four-year terms in office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election in even-numbered years. At an annual reorganization meeting, the members of the Council select one of their members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor. The Township Council hires a Township Manager, who serves as the Chief Executive and Administrative Officer of the Township.[7][42]

As of 2012, Pequannock's Township Council consists of Mayor Richard Phelan (R, whose term of office as mayor ends on December 31, 2012, and whose term on council ends in 2014), Deputy Mayor Melissa Florance-Lynch (R, 2014), Ed Engelbart (R, 2012), Joel D. Vanderhoff (R, 2012), and Catherine Winterfield (R, 2014).[4][43]

Ed Engelbart was named Township Historian, following a resolution passed on May 10, 2011, making him the first person to be named to this position in a decade.[44]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Pequannock Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[45] and is part of New Jersey's 40th state legislative district.[10][46][47] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Pequannock Township had been in the 26th state legislative district.[48]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[50][51] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[52][53]

The 40th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Kevin J. O'Toole (R, Cedar Grove) and in the General Assembly by Scott Rumana (R, Wayne) and David C. Russo (R, Ridgewood).[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[57] As of 2011, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director William J. Chegwidden (Wharton),[58] Deputy Freeholder Director Douglas R. Cabana (Boonton Township),[59] Gene F. Feyl (Denville),[60] Ann F. Grassi (Parsippany-Troy Hills),[61] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (Montville),[62] John J. Murphy (Morris Township)[63] and Hank Lyon (Montville Township),[64][65]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 10,911 registered voters in Pequannock Township, of which 2,242 (20.5%) were registered as Democrats, 4,042 (37.0%) were registered as Republicans and 4,625 (42.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[66]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 58.8% of the vote here (5,341 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 39.7% (3,608 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (84 votes), among the 9,088 ballots cast by the township's 11,236 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.9%.[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 62.0% of the vote here (4,889 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 37.1% (2,925 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (45 votes), among the 7,886 ballots cast by the township's 10,055 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 78.4.[68]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 58.5% of the vote here (3,550 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 33.1% (2,008 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.9% (420 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (49 votes), among the 6,073 ballots cast by the township's 11,127 registered voters, yielding a 54.6% turnout.[69]

Education[edit]

The Pequannock Township School District serves public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[70]) are three K-5 elementary schools — Stephen J. Gerace (385 students), Hillview (301) and North Boulevard (289 students) — Pequannock Valley Middle School for grades 6–8 (600) and Pequannock Township High School for grades 9–12 (729).

Holy Spirit is a Catholic school serving grades PK-8 operated under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson.[71] In addition, there is Kolbe Immaculata School (K-12), the Netherlands Reformed Christian School (PK-12) and Chancellor Academy (7–12).

Transportation[edit]

Two major roadways exist within the township; Interstate 287 crosses the northwest corner and Route 23 runs near the eastern boundary.

The Mountain View and Lincoln Park New Jersey Transit stations are both near Pequannock, offering service on the Montclair-Boonton Line to Hoboken Terminal. Pequannock Township was also formerly served by the Pompton Plains railroad station, which has been added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Bus service is provided by New Jersey Transit on the 194 line to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and on the 75 line to Newark.[72]

Downtown Pompton Plains is 19.8 miles (31.9 km) from Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark / Elizabeth, 14.1 miles (22.7 km) from Teterboro Airport, 13.7 miles (22.0 km) from Morristown Municipal Airport in Hanover Township, 11.5 miles (18.5 km) from Greenwood Lake Airport in West Milford, 6.6 miles (10.6 km) from Essex County Airport and 1.6 miles (2.6 km) from Lincoln Park Airport in Lincoln Park Borough.

Media[edit]

Pequannock is served by New York City TV stations. It is served by the newspapers The Star-Ledger, the Daily Record, and The Record of Bergen County, NJ.

Notable people[edit]

Some notable former and current residents of Pequannock Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Morris County Manual 2012, p. 55. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  5. ^ Township Manager, Pequannock Township. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  6. ^ Township Clerk, Pequannock Township. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 121.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Pequannock, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 – Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Pequannock township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 16. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Pequannock Township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Pequannock, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Pompton Plains, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  20. ^ Janoski, Steve. "Pequannock council gets history lesson on its sections", Suburban Trends, February 17, 2011. Accessed January 13, 2012. "Some residents have made comments recently about the description, which states that the township 'encompasses two communities, Pequannock and Pompton Plains, each served by their own post office.' These residents have said that the site should not make the distinction between the two sections.Wancyzk, however, is of a different view and spoke to the council about why he feels it's important that the page recognize both Pequannock and Pompton Plains."
  21. ^ Morris County profile of Pequannock Township, accessed November 9, 2006.
  22. ^ Town Information – Pequannock, accessed November 9, 2006.
  23. ^ "Top Towns: Bang for the Buck", New Jersey Monthly, August 15, 2011. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  24. ^ "Top Towns-Alphabetical List", "New Jersey Monthly", September 3, 2013. Accessed May 26, 2014.
  25. ^ Engelbart, Ed. Historic District Commission, Pequannock Township. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  26. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 196. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  27. ^ Pequannock Township Master Plan 1994–1995, p. 13. Pequannock Township. Accessed January 13, 2012. "The Pequannock Valley Middle School was erected in 1950 on the site of the circa 1790 Mandeville Inn."
  28. ^ Alexander, Andrea. "Rising to old heights", The Record (Bergen County), July 25, 2009. Accessed January 13, 2012. "Giles Mandeville House (minister's house): built in 1788, it is considered an example of early Dutch housing.... The minister's house might have served as a stop along the Underground Railroad for runaway slaves seeking freedom."
  29. ^ New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places: Morris County, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  30. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 17, 2013.
  31. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 17, 2013. Source shows a population in 1840 of 5,277, in conflict with the 5,190 shown in the table.
  32. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 256, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed December 20, 2012. "Pequannock, named for the tribe of Indians found there, contained in 1850, 4,126 residents; in 1860, 5,438; and in 1870, 1,534."
  33. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 140. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  34. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  35. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  36. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  37. ^ "Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I", United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  38. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  39. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Pequannock township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  40. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Pequannock township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  41. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Pequannock township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  42. ^ About Pequannock Township, Pequannock Township, backed up by the Internet Archive as of October 26, 2006. Accessed March 3, 2008.
  43. ^ Township Council, Pequannock Township. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  44. ^ Janoski, Steve. "Pequannock council names Engelbart 'township historian'", Suburban Trends, June 20, 2011. Accessed May 13, 2012. "Councilman Ed Engelbart was named Pequannock's official historian by the Township Council last month in a move that was approved by resolution on May 10.... Phelan said he found out the last time someone held that position in the township was over a decade ago, and after conversing with fellow council people, it was agreed that Engelbart should receive the title."
  45. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  50. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  52. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  53. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  55. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  56. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  57. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  58. ^ William J. Chegwidden, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  59. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  60. ^ Gene F. Feyl, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  61. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  62. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  63. ^ John J. Murphy, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  64. ^ Hank Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  65. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  66. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 21, 2012.
  67. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 21, 2012.
  68. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 21, 2012.
  69. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 21, 2012.
  70. ^ Data for the Pequannock Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  71. ^ Morris County Elementary / Secondary Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Accessed July 26, 2008.
  72. ^ Morris County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed January 13, 2012.
  73. ^ Kirkland, Bruce. "Jason Biggs proud of American Pie films", Toronto Sun, August 6, 2001. Accessed July 21, 2007. "Biggs, who was born May 12, 1978, in Pompton Plains, N.J., is the son of Gary Biggs, the manager of a shipping firm, and Angela Biggs, a nurse."
  74. ^ Biography of Peter Cameron, accessed January 3, 2007.
  75. ^ The Derek Jeter File, USA Today, September 17, 2002.
  76. ^ Danny Kass profile, United States Ski Team. Accessed June 3, 2007.
  77. ^ Pasquale, Don. "Pro advice: Davana Medina reveals her secret formula for sexy BI's and TRI's", Muscle & Fitness, December 2005. Accessed June 3, 2007. "CURRENT RESIDENCE Pompton Plains, New Jersey"
  78. ^ Rohan, Virginia. "Pompton Plains native is having fun as risqué ex-nun", The Record (Bergen County), July 17, 2007. Accessed July 19, 2007. "'I loved growing up in Pompton Plains. It really was a lovely small town. It's not small anymore,' says Misner, who studied dance, from age 11 to 18, with Nancy King at the King Centre for the Performing Arts in Wanaque."
  79. ^ Dicker, Ron. "Young's Star Rises in Midlife", San Francisco Chronicle, August 27, 2006. Accessed July 21, 2007. "A Pequannock, N.J., native and graduate of Douglass College, the women's school at Rutgers University, Young got her start on a film called 'Deep in the Heart' (1983)."

External links[edit]