Percy Deift

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Percy Alec Deift (born September 10, 1945)[1] is a mathematician known for his work on spectral theory, integrable systems, random matrix theory and Riemann–Hilbert problems.

Life[edit]

Deift was born in Durban, South Africa, where he obtained degrees in chemical engineering, physics, and mathematics, and he received a Ph.D. in mathematical physics from Princeton University in 1977.[2] He is a Silver Professor at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University.

Honors and awards[edit]

Deift is a fellow of the American Mathematical Society (elected 2012),[3] a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (elected 2003),[4] and of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (elected 2009).[5][6]

He is a co-winner of the 1998 Pólya Prize,[1][7] and was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 1999.[1][8] He gave an invited address at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Berlin in 1998[1][9] and plenary addresses in 2006 at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Madrid and at the International Congress on Mathematical Physics in Rio de Janeiro.[10] Deift gave the Gibbs Lecture at the Joint Meeting of the American Mathematical Society in 2009.[11]

Selected works[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]