Perihelion Science Fiction

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Perihelion Science Fiction
Perihelionsf.jpg
Editor Sam Bellotto Jr.
Categories science fiction
Frequency Monthly
First issue November 2012 (2012-November)
Country United States
Based in Rochester, New York
Language English
Website www.perihelionsf.com

Perihelion Science Fiction is an American online science fiction magazine specializing in hard science fiction.[1] The first issue was published November 12, 2012, and it has maintained a regular monthly update schedule since. Perihelion has published fiction by authors such as Joseph Green, Ken Liu, Aliya Whiteley, and Steve Stanton, including articles by National Press Club member John A. McCormick[2] and comic strips by Christopher Baldwin. Sam Bellotto Jr., is the editor and publisher.

Formats[edit]

Perihelion Science Fiction is published as an online webzine on the 12th of each month.[3]

History[edit]

Perihelion Science Fiction originated on November 1967. It was photo-offset, 40 pages, in black-and-white. It ran for only five issues.[4] As reported by Mike Ashley in his history of science fiction periodicals, Gateways to Forever, the magazine “presented a mixture of fannish news, articles, and fiction, including a heroic-fantasy comic strip, ‘Alaron’ by art editor William Stillwell. Amongst its fiction was work by writers who would soon be selling professionally, including Robert E. Toomey and Evelyn Lief.”[5] Further issues of Perihelion (April 1967-Summer 1969) were printed, with a professional style layout, with artwork by Vaughn Bodé and fiction by Dean R Koontz and David R Bunch. Bellotto did not pay contributors, and it was his failure to raise sufficient finance that closed the magazine.[6]

Over 40 years later, on November 12, 2012 Perihelion Science Fiction was relaunched as a professional online webzine.[7] it is now a paying market, currently offering one-cent per word.[8] Perihelion has been named one of the five best free Internet science fiction sites by Decades Review.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McCormick, John (2013-01-15). "Pulp SF on the Web". News Blaze. 
  2. ^ "The National Press Club". 
  3. ^ "Duotrope". 
  4. ^ "OCLC World Cat". 
  5. ^ Ashley, Mike (2007). Gateways to Forever. Liverpool University Press. pp. 237–238. ISBN 1846310032. 
  6. ^ "The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction". Retrieved 2012-10-18. 
  7. ^ "Locus Online". 
  8. ^ "Ralan". 
  9. ^ "Decades Review". 

External links[edit]