Perry McAdow House

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Perry McAdow House
PerryMcAdowHouse.jpg
Location 4605 Cass Avenue
Detroit, Michigan
Coordinates 42°21′11″N 83°3′56″W / 42.35306°N 83.06556°W / 42.35306; -83.06556Coordinates: 42°21′11″N 83°3′56″W / 42.35306°N 83.06556°W / 42.35306; -83.06556
Built 1891
Architect Martin Scholls & Son
Architectural style Renaissance Revival
Governing body Private
Part of Warren-Prentis Historic District (#97001477)
NRHP Reference # 80004405[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP July 03, 1980
Designated CP December 01, 1997
Designated MSHS December 14, 1976[2]

The Perry McAdow House is a Renaissance Revival house located at 4605 Cass Avenue in Midtown Detroit, Michigan. It was designated a Michigan State Historic Site in 1976[2] and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.[1]

History[edit]

Perry W. McAdow earned his fortune gold mining in Montana.[2] In 1891, he and his wife Clara built an elaborate mansion on Cass for a cost of $65,000 as an entrance into Detroit society.[3] The couple lived there until 1897.[2] The house was used as a private residence until 1913, when it was sold to the First Universalist congregation.[2] The church used it as a place of worship for three years until a new church immediately to the north was completed, after which the house was used as a parish house.[2]

Architecture[edit]

The house has two and a half stories with a hipped roof, and is constructed of red brick and brownstone.[2] The exterior boasts bay windows, Corinthian columned porches, parapet balustrades, and a modillion cornice; the interior features notable frescos, paneling, plasterwork and stained glass.[2] Behind the original house is a two-story, red brick church hall, built in 1917.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Perry McAdow House from the state of Michigan
  3. ^ First Unitarian-Universalist Church from the city of Detroit

Further reading[edit]

  • Hill, Eric J. and John Gallagher (2002). AIA Detroit: The American Institute of Architects Guide to Detroit Architecture. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-3120-3.