Personal supercomputer

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State of the Art Personal Supercomputer Providing 4 x16 PCIe Slots with nVidia K20 GPU Servers, Dual Intel 10-Core E5 XEON processors, 192GB RAM
...another State of the Art Personal Supercomputer, a MacPro6,1, Inaudible Asymmetrical Blade Single Pull-Through Fan Mounted Perpendicularly Atop a Unified Triangular Thermal Core Design, Encased in a Highly Reflective Polished Mirror Black Steel Cylindrical Housing Less Than 10 Inches Tall and Less Than 7 Inches in Diameter, Weighing Less than 11 Pounds, Providing 2 x16 PCIe-slotted AMD FirePro D700 GPUs with 6144 MB GDDR5 VRAM each, Single 12-Core E5 XENON Processor, 16 GB RAM Expandable for $1100 USD to 128 GB (price as of 2014 September) and 802.11ac 3x MIMO WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0, 6x 20 Gbit/s Bidirectionally Thunderbolt 2 ports, 2 xGigabit Ethernet ports, 4 xUSB 3 Ports, an Optical Digital Out/Analog Audio Out Port, a Headphones Out with Headphone Support Port, and a Mono Audio Speaker.

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A personal supercomputer (PSC) is a high-performance computer system with capabilities and costs between those of standard personal computers and supercomputers. They allow an individual or organization to have access to a significant amount of computing power and are often used for a single purpose. They are typically built by the user, but commercial models are available. Although considerably more expensive than a personal computer, PSCs are affordable to many people.

Architecture[edit]

A common way of building a PSC is syncing several computers with fast networking (commonly dual gigabit Ethernet switching per processor) linked by a gigabit network switch. Some PSCs[1] use clustered GPUs. For example, the TYANPSC uses 40 Xeon processors to achieve 256 gigaflops.

Applications[edit]

They can be used in medical applications for processing brain and body scans, resulting in faster diagnosis.[2] Another application is persistent aerial surveillance where large amounts of video data needs to be processed and stored.

Examples[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ganapati, Priya (August 3, 2009). "Personal Supercomputers Promise Teraflops on Your Desk". Wired.com. Retrieved 2011-07-08. 
  2. ^ Wardrop, Murray (2008-12-05). "World's first personal supercomputer unveiled". Telegraph. Retrieved 2011-07-08.