Peru Elementary School District 124

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For schools in other places named Peru, see Peru schools (disambiguation)
Peru Public School District
Peru Public Schools Logo.jpg
"Rich Past, Bright Future"
Type and location
Grades PK–8th
Established 1840
Country USA
Location LaSalle County, IL
District information
Budget $11.1 million[1]
Students and staff
Students 1,070
Staff 127
District mascot Raider
Other information
Board of education 7 members, elected to 4-year terms
Website www.perued.net

Peru Public Schools, formally named Peru Elementary School District 124, is the public school district responsible for public education below the high school level in Peru, Illinois, United States. It operates two elementary schools and one middle school. The school district was established in 1840. It has a current enrollment of about 1,070 students.[2]

Schools[edit]

Each of the district's schools serve a different age group. Northview Elementary School provides pre-kindergarten through first grade, Washington Elementary School has grades 2 to 4, and Parkside School is the district's middle school, enrolling grades 5 to 8. After middle school, children in the district are zoned to attend LaSalle-Peru High School in LaSalle.

Aurora University’s College of Education uses Parkside School as a cohort site for some of its graduate-level courses.[3]

History[edit]

The Peru public school district was established in 1840. William Bramwell Powell, author of numerous books,[4] father of violinist Maud Powell and brother of geologist John Wesley Powell, served as superintendent of Peru Elementary School District 124 from 1862 to 1870.[5] William Powell, or Bram, as he was known, wrote several textbooks that were used in classrooms throughout the United States.

In the 1990s the district broke new ground the area of special education by successfully supplying community-based services to allow a child disabled with Tourette's syndrome to remain in his home and his local schools instead of being sent away to receive specialized educational services. In 1999, it was estimated that this approach had resulted in annual cost savings of $63,000.[6]

2007 referendum[edit]

A 2006 task force of community members recommended that Roosevelt Elementary School, then 83 years old, be replaced by a new facility yet to be constructed. To generate funds for the new building, the school district formed an agreement with the city of Peru to raise sales tax by half a penny, generating approximately $1.5 million in revenue. The historic referendum was supported by more than 78 percent of taxpayers.[7]

New building[edit]

Parkside Middle School was built on a 28-acre plot of land owned by the school district. The 95,300-square-foot (8,850 m2) facility is designed to accommodate 600 students within its two academic wings. Parkside also features a state-of-the-art synergistics lab.[clarification needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fiscal Year 2011 Budget Fund Summary Archived 13 February 2011 at WebCite
  2. ^ Peru Public Schools - Peru Elementary School District 124...170 Years of Rich History Archived 13 February 2011 at WebCite
  3. ^ Aurora University Cohorts Archived 13 February 2011 at WebCite
  4. ^ W. B. Powell or "Bram" Powell co-authored a series called The Normal Course in Reading, some now available on Google Books.
  5. ^ The History of Peru Private and Public Schools: 1840 to 1990, by James Wright
  6. ^ Rita Stevenson, Wraparound Services; A community approach to keep even severely disabled children in local schools, The School Administrator, March 2003.
  7. ^ Healy, Bender & Associates, Inc.: News Archived 13 February 2011 at WebCite

External links[edit]