Peter Brookes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Peter Brooks (disambiguation).
Peter Brookes
Born Peter D. Brookes
(1943-09-28) September 28, 1943 (age 71)
Liverpool, England
Nationality British
Area(s) Political cartoonist, artist

Peter D. Brookes (born 28 September 1943)[1] is an English cartoonist who has produced work for numerous publications, including Radio Times, New Society, New Statesman, The Spectator and most notably The Times, for which he is the leader-page cartoonist. He has won the title of Cartoonist of the Year at the British Press Awards in 2012, 2011, 2010, 2007, and 2002.

Biography[edit]

Peter Brookes was born in Liverpool, on 28 September 1943, the son of an RAF Squadron Leader.[1] After school, he initially joined the RAF to train as a pilot but left to go to art college in Manchester, and then to the Central School of Art and Design in London.[1]

In the mid-1970s he replaced Chris Achilleos as regular jacket illustrator for Doctor Who novelisations from Target Books but his cartoon-style artwork proved less popular than Achilleos's more naturalistic style and he completed only four covers. In the 1970s, he was also a cartoonist for the Radio Times, taking over the main back-page cartoon from Marc Boxer in 1979.[2] He had a short stint as a political cartoonist for the New Statesman, before returning to academia and lecturing at the Central School of Art and the Royal College of Art. For a time he worked as cover artist for the Spectator but, in 1992, he moved to the Times, as its leader-page cartoonist, at the invitation of its newly appointed editor, Peter Stothard.[1]

He is particularly noted for his "Nature Notes" series of cartoons, begun in February 1996,[1] which portray various fictitious beasts, based on the appearance (and supposed habits) of well-known politicians. He has noted that a benefit of using animal images is that he can show his subjects doing things that, for reasons of decency, could not be published if they were portrayed as human[3]—Brookes said: "you are able to depict crap and fornication and that sort of thing".[1]

In 2009, he drew a controversial portrayal of Pope Benedict XVI with a condom on his head, which elicited a rebuke from Cardinal Cormac Murphy O'Connor.[4] He was also the subject of an exhibition at the Chris Beetles Gallery in London in October of that year.[5]

Brookes uses T. H. Saunders paper, on which he draws with Pelikan black ink and a dip pen, equipped with Gillott nibs, as well as watercolour and gouache. He says, "There are three stages to the way I draw cartoons: first they are rendered loosely in soft pencil, then I overlay that with pen and Indian ink, and finally I add tone and colour with watercolour."[1]

Brookes, along with his sons Will and Ben, is an avid fan of Premier League team Queens Park Rangers, holding a season ticket for over fifteen years.

Publications[edit]

  • Peter Brookes: The Best Cartoons of Peter Brookes [Hardcover] Little, Brown ISBN 0-316-72439-4
  • Peter Brookes: The Best of Times... A Cartoon Collection [Hardcover] Little, Brown ISBN 1-906779-58-9
  • Peter Brookes: Nature Notes IV. The Natural Selection' Little, Brown; 2004. ISBN 0-316-72722-9

Awards[edit]

  • British Press Awards: "Cartoonist of the Year" (2002, 2007, 2010, 2011)[6][7]
  • Political Cartoon Society: "Cartoonist of the Year" (2006, 2009)
  • Cartoon Art Trust: "Political Cartoonist of the Year" (1996, 1998, 2006,[1] 2008)
  • What the Papers Say Award: "Cartoonist of the Year" (2005)[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Peter Brookes biography". University of Kent British Cartoon Archive. Retrieved 20 September 2010. 
  2. ^ Currie, Tony (2001). The Radio Times story. Kelly. p. 146. ISBN 9781903053096. 
  3. ^ Franklin, Bob (2008). Pulling newspapers apart: analysing print journalism. Routledge. p. 77. ISBN 9780415425568. 
  4. ^ Ratzinger’s irresponsibility and religious mania bring condemnation
  5. ^ Whitworth, Damian (October 10, 2009). "A day in the scabrous life of the Times political cartoonist, Peter Brookes". The Times. Retrieved October 16, 2009. 
  6. ^ Press Gazette, Roll of Honour, accessed 24 July 2011
  7. ^ Press Gazette, 5 April 2011, Press Awards 2011: The full list of winners

External links[edit]