Peter J. Grubb

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Peter John Grubb (b. 1936 in Ilford, London[1]) is a British ecologist and emeritus professor of botany at Cambridge University. He took his Ph.D. at Cambridge University in 1960 supervised by G.E. Briggs. He subsequently joined the staff of Magdalene College, later becoming a full professor (retired in 2001). His early work was mentored by E.J.H. Corner and A.S. Watt, and especially influenced by the latter. He has written a very lively account on his becoming a plant ecologist.[2]

Grubb has worked on diverse botanical and ecological subjects, from physiology to biomes and from chalk grassland to tropical rain forest. His name is particularly associated with the concept of regeneration niche.[3]

Peter Grubb was president of the British Ecological Society in 1992 and is now honorary member of the society. He co-edited the Journal of Ecology 1972–1977.

In 1977 botanist Francis Raymond Fosberg named the Portulaca variety Portulaca mauritiensis var. grubbii from Cosmoledo after Grubb[4] which is now included in Portulaca mauritiensis var. aldabrensis.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Entry for Peter J. Grubb at JSTOR
  2. ^ Grubb, P.J. (2003) On becoming a plant ecologist. Seed Science Research 13: 3–15
  3. ^ Grubb, P.J. (1977) The maintenance of species-richness in plant communities: the importance of the regeneration niche. Biological Reviews 52: 107-145.
  4. ^ F. R. Fosberg: Miscellaneous Notes on the Flora of Aldabra and Neighbouring Islands: VI: Portulaca (Portulacaceae) in the Aldabra Group. Kew Bulletin, Vol. 32, No. 1 (1977), pp. 253-258
  5. ^ Urs Eggli: Illustrated Handbook of Succulent Plants: Dicotyledons, Springer, 2002. ISBN 978-3540419662: p. 413

External links[edit]