Peter Lynds

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Peter Lynds (born May 17, 1975) is a New Zealander who first drew attention in 2003 with the publication of a physics paper about time, mechanics and Zeno's paradoxes.

Lynds attended university for only 6 months.[1] He submitted an article entitled "Time and Classical and Quantum Mechanics: Indeterminacy vs. Discontinuity"[2] to the journal Foundations of Physics Letters. Among other things, the paper put forward a solution to Zeno's paradoxes based on the idea that instants, instantaneous magnitudes, determined positions, and time itself, do not actually exist. Around the same time, in September 2003, he deposited a closely related text called "Zeno's Paradoxes: A Timely Solution" in the PhilSci archive.[3]

Lynds rose to sudden prominence when the journal paper was published and a press release about it appeared on the scientific news site Eurekalert.org on July 31, 2003.[4] The paper caused much controversy, as was detailed in articles in The Guardian and Wired Magazine.[5][1] The implications of Peter Lynds' journal paper are discussed by various professors in a 2004 text.[6]

Since the appearance of his first article, Lynds has done work on the relationship of time to consciousness, perception and brain function. His main conclusion in this area is that our seeming innate subjective conception of a present moment in time, and the phenomenon of conscious awareness, are actually one and the same thing. He deposited a text about this at Cogprints and PhilSci archive in August 2003.[7][8]

Lynds in December 2006 put forward a new cosmology model in which time is cyclic and the universe repeats exactly an infinite number of times. Because it is exactly the same cycle that repeats, however, it can also be interpreted as happening just once in relation to time. Lynds argues that this resolves a number of thorny issues in cosmology.[9][10][11]

Lynds in August 2008 wrote an essay called "Time for a Change - The Instantaneous, Present and the Existence of Time" in an essay contest,[12][13] and in January 2012 published a paper called "Why there is something rather than nothing" in the arXiv physics archive.[14][15]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Time’s Up Einstein, Josh McHugh, Wired Magazine, June 2005
  2. ^ Time and Classical and Quantum Mechanics: Indeterminacy vs. Discontinuity. Foundations of Physics Letters (Vol. 16, Issue 4, 2003). doi:10.1023/A:1025361725408 arXiv:physics/0310055
  3. ^ Zeno's Paradoxes: A Timely Solution http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/1197/
  4. ^ Press release on Eurekalert.org <http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2003-07/icc-gwi072703.php>
  5. ^ David Adam (14 August 2003). "The Strange story of Peter Lynds". The Guardian. 
  6. ^ The Implications of Peter Lynds 'Time and Classical and Quantum Mechanics: Indeterminacy vs Discontinuity' for Mathematical modeling https://web.archive.org/web/20120510201143/http://www.casos.cs.cmu.edu/events/conferences/2004/2004_proceedings/Lynds.v2doc.doc
  7. ^ Subjective Perception of Time and a Progressive Present Moment: The Neurobiological Key to Unlocking Consciousness http://cogprints.org/3125/
  8. ^ Subjective Perception of Time and a Progressive Present Moment: The Neurobiological Key to Unlocking Consciousness http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/1360/.
  9. ^ On A finite universe with no beginning or end http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0612053.
  10. ^ Bang/Crunch/Bang. http://www.fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/111
  11. ^ A note on gravitational singularities http://www.necsi.edu/events/iccs7/papers/225LyndsPhysicalSys.pdf
  12. ^ FQXi FORUM http://www.fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/240
  13. ^ Time for a Change http://www.fqxi.org/data/essay-contest-files/Lynds_Time_for_a_Change__Th.pdf
  14. ^ Why there is something rather than nothing: The finite, infinite and eternal http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2720
  15. ^ Why there is something rather than nothing: The finite, infinite and eternal http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1205/1205.2720.pdf

External links[edit]