Jan Peter Toennies

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Professor Jan Peter Toennies (born 3 May 1930) is an American scientist and former director of the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (formerly named the Max Planck Institute for Flow Research). He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania of German immigrant parents.


Education[edit]

Lower Merion High School, Lower Merion, Pennsylvania 1948, Amherst College, Amherst, MA., B.A. 1952, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, Ph.D. in chemistry 1957. Fulbright student in Göttingen 1953–1954.

Professional record[edit]

  • 1957–1962 DFG Stipendium with Prof. W. Paul, Physics Institute, University of Bonn, Germany.
  • 1962–1965 Scientific assistant to Prof. W. Paul, Physics Institute, University of Bonn.
  • 1965–1967 Privat-Dozent, Physics Institute, University of Bonn.
  • 1967–1968 Dozent, Physics Institute, University of Bonn.
  • 1965–1974 Visiting Professor, Institute for Physical Chemistry, Göteborg University.
  • 1969–1998 Appointment to Scientific Member of the Max-Planck-Society and Director at the Max-Planck-Institute für Strömungsforschung (now Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization).
  • 1971 – Associate Professor, University of Göttingen; Adjunct-Professor, University of Bonn.
  • 1998–2002 Acting Director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Strömungsforschung.
  • 2002–2007 Emeritus Scientific Member of the Max-Planck-Society

Prizes and special recognition[edit]

  • 1964 Physics Prize of the Academy of Sciences, Göttingen
  • 1983 "Fellow" of the American Physical Society
  • 1988 Alumni Citation, Brown University
  • 1990 Corresponding Member of the Academy of Sciences in Göttingen
  • 1991 Gold Heyrovsky Medal of the Czech Academy of Sciences
  • 1992 Hewlett-Packard Europhysics Prize for solid state physics
  • 1992 Max-Planck-Prize of the Germany Research Society and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation
  • 1993 Member of the Germany Academy of Natural Scientists "Leopoldina" in Halle, Germany
  • 1996 Recipient of the first MOLEC Conference Award
  • 1999 Honorary Fellow of the International Molecular Beams Symposium
  • 2000 Honorary Doctorate in Philosophy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • 2002 Stern-Gerlach Gold Medal of the German Physical Society
  • 2005 Kolos Medal of University of Warsaw
  • 2006 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics (with Giacinto Scoles)
  • 2007 Honorary Doctorate in Science, Amherst College, MA, USA

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Z. Herman (1995). "Jan Peter Toennies On his 65th Birthday". Ber. Bunsengesellschaft Phys. Chem. 99: 781–782.