Petr Chylek

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Petr Chylek is a researcher for Space and Remote Sensing Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Prior to becoming a government researcher in 2001, Chylek was a Professor at several US and Canadian universities including SUNY Albany, Purdue University, University of Oklahoma and Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada.

Chylek has published over 100 first authored scientific papers in remote sensing, atmospheric radiation, climate change, cloud and aerosol physics, applied laser physics and ice core analysis. His work has been cited more than 4000 times. Chylek is best known for his work in remote sensing, aerosols and climate change.

In 2006, Chylek served as Chairman, Scientific Program Committee for The Second International Conference on Global Warming and the Next Ice Age held at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Santa Fe, NM. Speakers included Venkatachalam Ramaswamy, Chris Folland, Gerald North, Roger A. Pielke, William M. Gray and Jan Veizer. The conference included a two-day workshop on climate prediction uncertainties. The papers presented at the 2006 Conference were published in a special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres in 2007. The Conference is held each 5th year. The next one will be in 2011.

In 2007, Chylek and co-authors published a peer-reviewed paper estimating climate sensitivity to doubled atmospheric CO2 to be significantly less than the IPCC estimate.[1]

Chylek received his diploma in theoretical physics from Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. He received his Ph.D. in physics from UC Riverside in 1970.

Honors[edit]

  • Fellow of the Optical Society of America (elected 1989)
  • Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (elected in 2006)
  • Fellow of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (named in 2006).

2009 Open Letter to the Climate Research Community[edit]

In late 2009, in reaction to the controversy over the contents of emails from the Climatic Research Unit e-mail hacking incident, Petr Chylek authored an email titled "Open Letter to the Climate Research Community" and sent it to 100 of his Climate Research peers. In the email, he writes that the climate science community has "substituted the search for truth with an attempt at proving one point of view" and suggests "Let us drastically modify or temporarily discontinue the IPCC." He also appeals for climate scientists to stop making what he calls "unjustified claims and exaggerated projections about the future even if the editors of some eminent journals are just waiting to publish them."[2]

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