Petro-aggression

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Petro-aggression occurs when a revolutionary government comes to power in a petrostate (an oil-exporting country).[citation needed] Oil on its own does not cause international aggression. But the combination of oil and revolution is dangerous. One study suggests that petro-revolutionary states are 250 percent more likely to instigate international conflicts than a typical country.[1]

It remains unclear whether the pattern of petro-aggression found in oil-rich countries also applies to other natural resources besides oil.[2]

Possible examples[edit]

  • Biafra
  • Indonesia
  • Iraq
  • Iran
  • Libya

Possible counter-examples[edit]

  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Azerbaijan
  • Brazil
  • Ecuador
  • Romania
  • Venezuela

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Colgan, Jeff (2013). Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War. Cambridge University Press. 
  2. ^ Homer-Dixon, Thomas (1999). Environment, Scarcity, and Violence. Princeton University Press. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Colgan, Jeff (2013). Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War. Cambridge University Press. 
  • Ross, Michael (2012). The Oil Curse. Princeton University Press. 
  • Yergin, Daniel (2008). The Prize.