Phenix (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Phenix
Studio album by Cannonball Adderley
Released 1975
Recorded February–April, 1975
Genre Jazz
Length 71:45
Label Fantasy
Producer Julian "Cannonball" Adderley, Nat Adderley, and Orrin Keepnews
Cannonball Adderley chronology
Pyramid
(1974)
Phenix
(1975)
Lovers
(1975)

Phenix is an album by jazz saxophonist Cannonball Adderley recorded in 1975 at the Fantasy Studios in Berkeley, California, featuring performances by Adderley's Quintet with Nat Adderley, Michael Wolff, Walter Booker and Roy McCurdy with guest percussionist Airto Moreira and sessions featuring past Quintet members George Duke, Sam Jones, and Louis Hayes.[1]

Reception[edit]

The Allmusic review by Scott Yanow awarded the album 4 stars and states: "Adderley's next-to-last recording (cut just four months before he died of a stroke at age 46) was ironically a retrospective.... A recommended set with plenty of excellent music, it serves as a fine overview of Cannonball Adderley's career."[2]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[2]
The Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide 1/5 stars[3]

Track listing[edit]

All compositions by Julian "Cannonball" Adderley except as indicated

  1. "Hi-Fly" (Randy Weston) - 6:04
  2. "Work Song" (Nat Adderley) - 6:28
  3. "Sack O' Woe" - 5:06
  4. "Jive Samba" (Nat Adderley) - 5:19
  5. "This Here" (Bobby Timmons) - 7:12
  6. "The Sidewalks of New York" (James W. Blake, Charles B. Lawlor) - 5:37
  7. "Hamba Nami" - 5:24
  8. "Domination" - 6:55
  9. "74 Miles Away" (Joe Zawinul) - 5:58
  10. "Country Preacher" (Zawinul) - 4:26
  11. "Stars Fell on Alabama" (Mitchell Parish, Frank Perkins) - 5:48
  12. "Walk Tall/Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" (Queen Esther Marrow, Jim Rein, Zawinul/Zawinul) - 7:28
  • Recorded at Fantasy Studios in Berkeley, CA, in February, March & April 1975

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cannonball Adderley discography, accessed November 4, 2009.
  2. ^ a b Yanow, S. Allmusic review, accessed November 4, 2009.
  3. ^ Swenson, J. (Editor) (1985). The Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide. USA: Random House/Rolling Stone. p. 5. ISBN 0-394-72643-X.