Phenix City, Alabama

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Phenix City
City
View of Phenix City from a plane
View of Phenix City from a plane
Location in Russell County and the state of Alabama
Location in Russell County and the state of Alabama
Coordinates: 32°28′22″N 85°1′12″W / 32.47278°N 85.02000°W / 32.47278; -85.02000Coordinates: 32°28′22″N 85°1′12″W / 32.47278°N 85.02000°W / 32.47278; -85.02000
Country United States
State Alabama
Counties Russell, Lee
Government
 • Mayor Eddie N. Lowe
Area
 • Total 24.8 sq mi (64.1 km2)
 • Land 24.6 sq mi (63.7 km2)
 • Water 0.2 sq mi (0.4 km2)
Elevation 243 ft (74 m)
Population (2012)[1]
 • Total 36,185
 • Density 1,139.7/sq mi (469.06/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 36867-36870
Area code(s) 334
FIPS code 01-59472
GNIS feature ID 0155193
Website http://www.phenixcityal.us

Phenix City is a city in Lee and Russell counties in the State of Alabama, and the county seat of Russell County.[2] As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 32,822.

Phenix City is sometimes called a Hub City,[clarification needed] as it lies immediately west of Columbus, Georgia, which is a much larger city. It is included in the Columbus, Georgia-Alabama Metropolitan Statistical Area Columbus, Georgia metropolitan area, but a section is located in Lee County, and is, therefore, in the Auburn, Alabama metropolitan area in Alabama.

In 2007, BusinessWeek named Phenix City the nation's #1 Best Affordable Suburb to raise a family.[3]

Currently, the mayor is Eddie N. Lowe, the first black mayor elected by the public. The city manager, who holds the task of organizational matters, is Wallace Hunter.

Geography[edit]

Phenix City is located at 32°28′22″N 85°1′12″W / 32.47278°N 85.02000°W / 32.47278; -85.02000 (32.472822, -85.020121)[4].

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 24.8 square miles (64 km2), of which, 24.6 square miles (64 km2) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) of it (0.61%) is water.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by relatively high temperatures and evenly distributed precipitation throughout the year. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Phenix City has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[5]

Climate data for Phenix City, Alabama
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 14
(57)
16
(61)
21
(69)
25
(77)
29
(84)
32
(90)
33
(92)
33
(91)
30
(86)
25
(77)
20
(68)
15
(59)
24.4
(75.9)
Average low °C (°F) 2
(36)
4
(39)
7
(45)
11
(52)
16
(61)
21
(69)
22
(72)
22
(71)
19
(66)
12
(54)
7
(44)
3
(38)
12.2
(53.9)
Precipitation mm (inches) 104
(4.1)
114
(4.5)
145
(5.7)
104
(4.1)
97
(3.8)
99
(3.9)
135
(5.3)
100
(4)
84
(3.3)
58
(2.3)
91
(3.6)
114
(4.5)
1,245
(49.1)
Source: Weatherbase [6]

History[edit]

Russell County Courthouse in Phenix City

The last true battle of the Civil War took place in Phenix City, then known as Girard.[7]

In the late 19th century, Girard made up most of current downtown Phenix City, while Phenix City was mostly in Lee County. In the early 20th century, the two towns consolidated into the present Phenix City as county lines were redrawn to account for population shifts involved in the Auburn University opening and expansion.

Phenix City was notorious during the 1940s and 1950s for being a haven for organized crime, prostitution, and gambling. Many of its customers came from the United States Army training center at Fort Benning, Georgia. The leaders of the crime syndicate in Phenix City were Jimmie Matthews and Hoyt Sheppard. Albert Patterson, from Phenix City, was elected to become attorney general of Alabama on a platform of reforming the city, but was brutally shot down outside his office on 14th Street. As a result, the city had a negative reputation, and many people still associate this legacy with Phenix City. The Tragedy and the Triumph of Phenix City, Alabama by Margaret Ann Barnes chronicles these events, which led the small town to be known as "Sin City, USA". The bordertown was the subject of an acclaimed film, The Phenix City Story, made in 1955.

In 1955, it won the All-America City Award from the National Municipal League.

Religion[edit]

Christianity[edit]

Phenix City is home to many Christian churches. The denominations are as follows:[8]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 2,224
1890 3,700 66.4%
1900 4,153 12.2%
1910 4,555 9.7%
1920 5,432 19.3%
1930 13,852 155.0%
1940 15,351 10.8%
1950 23,305 51.8%
1960 27,630 18.6%
1970 25,281 −8.5%
1980 26,928 6.5%
1990 25,312 −6.0%
2000 28,265 11.7%
2010 32,822 16.1%
Est. 2012 36,185 10.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
2012 Estimate[11]
Phenix City Municipal building

As of the census of 2000, there were 28,265 people, 11,517 households, and 7,566 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,149.1 people per square mile (443.6/km²). There were 13,250 housing units at an average density of 538.7 per square mile (208.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 52.94% White, 44.97% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.56% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. 1.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 11,517 households out of which 31.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.4% were married couples living together, 22.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.3% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.3% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 86.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $26,720, and the median income for a family was $33,740. Males had a median income of $28,906 versus $21,348 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,619. About 18.8% of families and 21.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.5% of those under age 18 and 20.6% of those age 65 or over.

Time zone[edit]

Although Alabama is legally in the Central Time Zone, Phenix City's proximity to the larger city of Columbus, Georgia causes Phenix City (including its municipal government) and areas within a 10-15 mile radius (such as Smiths Station) to observe Eastern Time on a de facto basis.[12][13][14][15]

Media[edit]

Phenix City also receives all major television networks and radio stations from nearby Columbus, Georgia. There are, however, three radio stations licensed in Phenix City: WURY-LP (97.1 FM), WGSY (100.1 FM), and WHAL (1460 AM).

Sister cities[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

Notable persons[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 21 May 2012. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Best Affordable Suburbs 2007". BusinessWeek. December 13, 2007. Retrieved February 11, 2008. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ Climate Summary for Phenix City, Alabama
  6. ^ "Weatherbase.com". Weatherbase. 2013.  Retrieved on September 28, 2013.
  7. ^ The Last True Battle
  8. ^ Churches in Phenix City, Alabama
  9. ^ Adventist Church Connect - Phenix City
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved June 6, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Retrieved June 6, 2013. 
  12. ^ "northamerica". tzdata. IANA. 2012c. Retrieved 2012-06-08. 
  13. ^ "A time zone can be a state of mind". The Huntsville Times. 2005-08-26. p. 2A. 
  14. ^ Grubman, Cathy (1994-10-27). "What Time Is It Anyway? It Depends on Your Location & the Season". The Washington Post. 
  15. ^ "Exceptions, Oddities, and Notes". OnTimeZone.com. Retrieved 2012-06-08. 

External links[edit]