Phil Lowe

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Phil Lowe
Personal information
Born (1950-01-19) 19 January 1950 (age 64)[1]
Hull, England
Playing information
Height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight 16 st 3 lb (103.0 kg; 227.0 lb)
Position Second-row
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1967–83 Hull Kingston Rovers 418 179 537
1974–76 Manly-Warringah 72 25 0 0 75
Total 490 204 0 0 612
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1968–78 Yorkshire
1970–81 England 5 2 0 0 6
1970–78 Great Britain 12 0 0 0 6
Coaching information
Club
Years Team Gms W D L W%
≤1984–≥87 York
Source: rugbyleagueproject.org englandrl.co.uk

[2]

Phil Lowe (born (1950-01-19) 19 January 1950 (age 64) in Hull) is an English Rugby League World Cup winning footballer of the 1960s, '70s and '80s, and coach of the 1980s, playing at representative level for Great Britain,[3] England,[4] and Yorkshire, and at club level for Hull Kingston Rovers, and Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles, as a Second-row, i.e. number 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums, and coaching at club level for York. As of 2011, Phil Lowe is the Landlord of The Shakespeare public house, 9 Baxtergate, Hedon.

His fellow player, Mike Stephenson described Lowe as "Phil had a magnificent physique. He had a high leg movement and the ability to stride out of a tackle. A giant of a man and a brilliant exponent of a forward running out wide in the centre areas".[5]

Playing career[edit]

Whilst playing for Hull Kingston Rovers, Lowe helped Great Britain to victory in the final of the 1972 World Cup. His 26 tries in the 1972/3 season, was a club record scoring feat by a Hull Kingston Rovers forward, beating William Sandham's 25-tries scored in the 1912–13 season.[6] He was Hull Kingston Rovers's 'Player of the Season' in both 1968/9 and 1972/3.[7] Down under, Lowe played for Manly-Warringah in their victory in the 1976 NSWRFL season's Grand Final, scoring his team's only try of the match. Back home again, he also played in the 1980 Challenge Cup final against Hull F.C., being part of the Cup winning side.[8] His testimonial match at Hull Kingston Rovers took place in 1981.

Coaching career[edit]

He retired from playing in 1983, and began a spell coaching at York, assisting them to both promotion and a place in the semi-finals of the Challenge Cup.[5] Lowe also undertook the role as a director of Hull Kingston Rovers. In 1995, he was the manager of England's Rugby League World Cup team.[1]

Outside of rugby league[edit]

He later became a publican, running several pubs around the Hull and East Yorkshire area, and was also involved in property investment.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Phil Lowe". Rugbyleagueproject.org. Retrieved 13 December 2011. 
  2. ^ Ulyatt, Michael E. (1983). Hull Kingston Rovers - A Centenary History 1883-1983 (1st ed.). North Ferriby: Lockington Publishing Co. Ltd. p. 140. ISBN 0-905490-24-X. 
  3. ^ "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  4. ^ "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c Paul Fletcher and Phil Harlow. "When Great Britain won the World Cup". BBC.co.uk. Retrieved 13 December 2011. 
  6. ^ Ulyatt, Michael E. (1983). Hull Kingston Rovers - A Centenary History 1883-1983 (1st ed.). North Ferriby: Lockington Publishing Co. Ltd. p. 113. ISBN 0-905490-24-X. 
  7. ^ Ulyatt, Michael E. (1983). Hull Kingston Rovers - A Centenary History 1883-1983 (1st ed.). North Ferriby: Lockington Publishing Co. Ltd. p. 110. ISBN 0-905490-24-X. 
  8. ^ Eraofthebiff.com

External links[edit]